Dorothy Loeb Biographical Chronology icon

Dorothy Loeb Biographical Chronology


Dorothy Loeb Biographical Chronology

By Catherine Loeb Schmit, 2011





Year

Month

Day

Event

1838

10

11

Adolph Loeb is born in Bechtheim, Rhein-Hessen, Germany to Jakob and Ester Loeb

1843

2

28

Adolph’s brother William Loeb is born in Bechtheim, Rhein-Hessen, Germany. (William’s son is Maurice, grandfather to author. Maurice is Dorothy Loeb’s first cousin)

1845

1

4?

Johanna Mannheimer. Birth: 1845 - Fellheim, Unterallgau, Bayern, Germany

1853

11

15

Adolph Loeb arrives on the ship “Van Cluse” from Le Havre to New York

1865

6

12

Johanna arrives in New York from Bavaria with her mother Charlotte Mannheimer (widow of Dr. Ludwig Mannheimer)

1869

6

20

^ Adolph Loeb and Johanna Mannheimer marry in Chicago, IL

1873







The railroad arrives in Provincetown making is accessible to tourists and artists.

1878

10

10

Nettie Blanche Lazzell born on a farm in Maidsville, West Virginia. She studied at West Virginia Wesleyan and West Virginia University under William Leonard (who had studied at Academie Julian in Paris). Later she studied with William Merritt Chase at New York Art Students League. Charles Hawthorne was his teaching assistant who later opened his own school in Provincetown.

1882- 1883







Adolph and Johanna take an extended vacation in Europe

1884







Adolph listed s Secretary of Sinai Congregation in Chicago

1887







^ Adolph and Johanna visit Johanna’s family in Germany where Dorothy is born.

1887

7

3

Dorothy was born in Starnberg, Bavaria, Germany the youngest of 8 children of Adolph Loeb and Johanna Mannheimer Loeb of Chicago, IL, who were traveling abroad. Her other siblings are Esther, Bertha, Jacob A., Leonore, Ludwig, Eva, and Gertrude.

1890’s







Adolph has a real estate company

1899







Charles Webster Hawthorne opened his Cape Cod School of Art. By 1915 had about 90 students.

1900







E. Ambrose Webster opened his Summer School of Painting. He studies Monet’s later works and taught an advanced approach to color.

1900







The U.S. Census showed 12 year old ^ Dorothy living with older sister Esther and her husband Henry Greenebaum at 44th Street and Hyde Park Township in Chicago. Also living there were Esther’s 2 children Charlotte and Sarah, 3 siblings Jacob, Eva, Gertrude, and mother Johanna.

1903

3

15

^ Dorothy’s father Adolph dies in Chicago, IL. Dorothy is 15 years old.

1909







A Study in Primitive Forge (The Lost Mural)… Dorothy Loeb (21) created the immense and powerful mural for the newly established Albert G. Lane Tech in 1909. She won a contest sponsored by the Chicago Public School Art Society and commissioned by Kate Buckingham. It graced the stage of the school’s auditorium for many years. Lost for over 50 years, it was restored and re-commissioned in 2005

1908-1913







Loeb and 4 other artists painted 11 murals at Lane Technical High School.




Year

Month

Day

Event

1910







The U.S. Census showed ^ Dorothy 21 still at Esther’s house but at 4346? North Hermitage. Esther has 4 children and mother Johanna (64) and 3 servants living there. Esther’s youngest were twin boys, Henry and Michael.

1910

6

17

Dorothy Loeb (23) wins a Frederick Magnus Brand prize for Composition of $25 at the closing exercises of the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. The various prizes and honors for the work of the year have come to take the place of the academic diploma, the granting of which has been discontinued.

1910







Dorothy completed the mural “Columbus Landing in America” for John M. Smyth Elementary School in Chicago, IL

1912







Blanche travels throughout Europe and studies at Paris’s Academie Moderne and with Charles Guerin and David Rosen. ^ Dorothy studied in Paris with Ferdinand Leger, Louis Marcoussis, and Henri Martin; and in Munich with Heinrich Knirr. She gained familiarity of avant-garde painting including cubism and futurism. Dorothy exhibited in France at the American Girls Club of Paris.

1913







Blanche returns to West Virginia to start her own art school.

1913

11

25

^ Dorothy boards the ship Martha Washington in Palermo, Italy. The ship originated out of Trieste, Italy.

1913

12

8

Ellis Island - Doroty Loeb, age 26, arrives from port of Patras on the ship Martha Washington. The paperwork did say “Doroty”.

1913







^ Dorothy returns to Chicago and lives at 4346 Hermitage Ave. She continues her studies at the Art Institute of Chicago working under Birge Harrison.

1913







^ Armory Show introduced Modernism and made a rift in the art world.

1914

8

22

Provincetown Art Association was organized in the Nautilus Club Room. First exhibit is 1915 in the north room of the Town Hall, as well as the next 5 exhibits. 1915 there were 147 members. 1917 there were 289 members. 1958 more than 400 members. The Ninth annual exhibit was at the Museum which is the Art Center.

1915







^ Blanche Lazzell starts summering in Provincetown and attends Charles Hawthorne’s Cape Cod School of Art. She establishes a studio in Provincetown. Six artists form the Provincetown Printers, developing a unique method of woodcut printing, making single block or “white line” prints. By 1918 they established a gallery.

1915-17







^ Dorothy’s initial art studies had taken place at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago where she exhibited in 1915-17 and again in 1929. Ross Moffett also attended classes at the Art Institute in 1911 until 1913. Paintings from the 1913 Armory Show came to Chicago, providing Dorothy with influence of Henri Matisse. It is possible she followed Ross Moffett and his roommate, Henry Sutter to attend Charles Hawthorne’s Cape Cod School of Art (founded in 1899) and attended by Blanche Lazzell. Dorothy also studied privately with Thomas Woods Stevens.

1912-17







Dorothy exhibits at “Annual Exhibition of Works by Chicago and Vicinity Artists”, Art Institute of Chicago. Dorothy taught at Hull House on Halstead Street in Chicago during at least part of this time period.

1916

8

27

^ Boston Globe headline reads “Biggest Art Colony in the World at Provincetown”. More than 300 artists, 25 year round. The 1916 catalogue advertised 5 art schools: The West End School of Art, George Elmer Browne; A Summer School of Painting, E. Ambrose Webster; The Cape Cod School of Art, Charles W. Hawthorne, with assistant Oscar Gieberich and director Harry N. Cambbell; A Modern Art School, Bror J. O. Nordflet etc and a Class in Color and Monochrome Etchings, George Senseney. Only the first 3 lasted more than 2 years.

1916







^ Expatriates in Paris return fleeing war. Influx of poets, novelists, journalists and playwrights; and artists from Greenwich Village brought bohemian lifestyle.




Year

Month

Day

Event

1916







The Art Association sent out a traveling exhibit of 43 paintings and 25 prints.

1918







The Art Association bought the Bangs property. In 1920 bought the adjacent property and tore down the Bangs House.

1918







Blanche took a studio on the waterfront in Provincetown, rebuilt it in 1926, and produced her art from there for 40 years. It was torn down in 2002. To escape WWI artists flocked from European capitals to Provincetown. Among the new artists was B. J. O. Norfeldt, a printmaker. He honed down the multi-block printmaking to a single block with different color elements separated by deep lines that left a white outline around each section of the print. The Provincetown Printers were born. Lazzell added her own modernistic cubist design elements, resulting in distinctive and bold prints. For the remainder of her life she painted and printed with vibrant strength and flow.

1920







The U.S. Census in ^ 1920 showed Dorothy living in Manhattan where she rented

1920’s







Provincetown Painting Classes begun by Ross Moffett and Heinrich Pfieffer were Modernist in approach.

1923-1924







In a ^ 1923 sojourn in Paris where Blanche Lazzell studied with Fernand Leger, Andre L’Hote and Albert Gleizes, she met Loeb who was also studying with Leger. Dorothy also studies with Louis Marcoiussis. (It is possible that they had met beforehand and traveled to Paris together.) Lazzell painted Loeb in the nude during those classes and that painting is included in the current show.

1920’s







^ Dorothy is a Socialist as were many artists, authors, and intellectuals. A. Mitchell Palmer, Woodrow Wilson’s Attorney General, authorized “Palmer’s Raids” to route out the “Reds” and Socialists. Dorothy at one point was a target.

1923-1949







Dorothy worked in Provincetown area

1923







The Art Association trustees appointed Charles A. Kaeselau acting director, a former student of School of the Institute (as was Ross Moffett.)

1923







^ Loeb first showed at the Provincetown Art Association with ‘My Neighbor’s Barn” Over the years she was influenced by Matisse and by the cubists. Her work continued to show impressionistic leanings mixed with more abstraction. Loeb produced monotypes as did Ross Moffett. Moffett’s Adam & Eve resembled those of Dorothy Loeb. (Monotypes are a combination of painting and printing which results in only one good impression.) Loeb’s monotypes were lyrical bordering on mystical. The allegorical prints abound with creativity, fantasy, and a fertile imagination.

1924







Blanche Lazzell, age 46, of Morgantown, West Virginia, arrives at Ellis Island from La Havre on ship Suffren.

1926







^ Loeb and Lazzell were among 30 signatories on a petition to the Art Association asking for equal exhibition time, space and prominence for the modernists who had been pushed aside in favor of the traditionalists since the association’s inception in 1914. They were on the committee in charge of the exhibit and served on the jury.

1926







^ Who’s Who in American Jewry - p 367: artist: b July 2, 1887; ed. Art Institute of Chicago, Munich, Paris, Awarded Tuesday art and Travel Club European Scholarship. Works include decorations in Lane Technical High School and Smith Public School, Chicago. Dorothy taught art at the art Institute in Chicago, and at Hull House. Address: Hermitage Ave., Chicago, IL

1927







The ‘First Modernistic Exhibition’ was scheduled for July 1927, and Loeb and Lazzell, along with Lucy L’Engle, Agnes Weinrich and Ellen Ravenscroft, plus seven male artists formed the jury and hanging committee. ^ For 10 years the moderns and traditionalists hung in separate but equal summer shows until finally merging in 1937.




Year

Month

Day

Event

1927







Contemporary and Early Provincetown Art …... …In 1927, ^ Dorothy Loeb was included as a “star” by Nancy W. Paine Smith in her “Book About the Artists”

1927







Dorothy painted South Truro landscape so may have lived there at this time.

1927-1928







Dorothy produces a lot of brightly colored watercolor paintings, mostly abstract florals and landscapes. Eight are titled “Fantasy Landscape”. Loeb’s paintings are looser than Blanche Lazzell’s, more organic and fanciful. (Cape Cod Times 1/26/02) Her unusual colors were scorned as crude and defiant and generally were too avant-garde for the traditional conservative Bostonians.

1928







Exhibition “American Painters Today”, Worchester (MA) Museum (or 1938?)

1929







Exhibit at the ^ Art Institute of Chicago where she studied 1915-1917. Listing in 1929 American Art Annual notes that she studied in Munich.

1920-1929







Some time during this period ^ Dorothy taught art at Hull House in Chicago. Per Cheryl Ganz, author of “Pots of Promise: Mexicans and Pottery at Hull House”, “Through teachers attracted to the settlement, students were exposed to several of the styles of the modernist movement. Dorothy Loeb studied in Paris under Fernard Leger and her work reflected the influence of Matisse.”

1929







American Art Annual Biographical Directory American Artists, Vol XXVI 1929, ^ Dorothy Loeb, Litchfield, Conn., summer Provincetown, MA., P., E. - Pupil of AIC; studies in Paris and Munich. Member: Provincetown AA

1931

11

26

Dorothy spent the summer in Paris, sailed for New York 11/18. Loeb has spent many summers in Provincetown.

1932

6

30

Dorothy Loeb, well-known artist, returned from Chicago to her Provincetown summer home, Avellar Cottage. ^ Miss Loeb spent the winter in Paris.

1933

7

2

Dorothy’s mother Johanna Loeb dies in Chicago, IL, (a day before Dorothy’s 46th birthday).

1933

7

6

Modernist Exhibition “Other artists whose work are arousing interest are…Dorothy Loeb”

1933

7

7

^ Provincetown Art Association holds Sixth Annual Modernist Exhibit. The Provincetown Advocate reads “A goodly number of modernists are represented, among which such prominent names stand out as Dorothy Loeb…” “Dorothy Loeb is well represented with 4 pictures; 3 of which are landscapes, done in true Modernistic manner, and the forth is a study of a feminine figure, Girl and Jug. - Dorothy Loeb has contributed her interpretation of the seaside in her boats. - On the balcony etchings and prints may be viewed. Blanche Lazzelle… Ross Moffett... Dorothy Loeb… have contributed their work.”

1933







^ Blanche moves to Morganstown, W.V. to work for the Public Works of Art Project

1933-34







Dorothy worked on a mural “Man and the Social Sciences” for the Hall of Social Sciences in the Century of Progress Exposition of Paintings and Sculptures in Chicago. Also exhibited at AIC. She painted the transportation mural “Post Office”.

1934

8

16

“Auctions of Paintings, Drawings, and Prints will be held in Town Hall on Friday and Saturday evenings.” The pictures are from the studios of prominent artists of Provincetown among who are …Dorothy Loeb…” “Richard Cox will be the auctioneer on Saturday evenings.”

1930’s







Sometime in the 1930’s Dorothy taught for several years at the Metairie Park Country Day School, 300 Park Road, Metairie LA 70005. Several family members supported Dorothy by sending $100/month.




Year

Month

Day

Event

1935







In 1935, Vernon Smith of Cape Cod became supervisor for the Works Progress Administration (WPA) Federal Art Project in Southeast Massachusetts, which brought him into close contact with many local artists—among them Blanche Lazzell, Edith Hughes, Dorothy Loeb, Bruce McKain, Vernon Coleman, Charles Heinz, Charles Kaeselau, Fritz Pfeiffer, Philip Malicoat, George Yater, Fritz Fuglister, and Karl Knaths, whose work he much admired. In this position, he was responsible for placing the paintings and murals of his artist-clients in schools and other public buildings.

1935







Hans Hofmann opened his Summer School of Art, fames as teacher of abstract modernism, and taught for 30 years while maintaining his New York school in the winter.

Late 1930’s







Dorothy continued to use Chicago as her home base until the late 1930’s (at one time lived on Rush street). Dorothy lived in Litchfield Connecticut and Provincetown and later she moved permanently to South Orleans, MS. She often painted scenes of Truro.

1936

2

6

“Artist and Writers Union of Provincetown meeting will be held at the studio of Dorothy Loeb at 358 Commercial Street at 7:30.”

1936

2

13

“Artist And Writers Union Elects Officers” “At a meeting of the Artist and Writers Union held at the studio of Dorothy Loeb on Friday evening, officers and standing committees were elected and steps were taken to establish the present membership under he strict high standards of professional craftsmanship. The officers and committees elected were as follows: executive secretary Ross Moffett; recording secretary Robert B. Rodgers; treasurer Otto Knaths. - These committees are … investigations, George Willison chairman, with Ross Moffett and Dorothy Loeb…” “Several members of the local union have been accepted as members of the American Artists Congress, which is meeting in public session at Town Hall in New York City.” (The next meeting was at Ross Moffett’s studio and after that the meetings were for members only.)

1936

3

23

^ The American League Against War and Fascism will meet at the studio of Dorothy Loeb at 358 Commercial St. Rear stairway, top floor. The Rev. Mr. Arthur will speak. George Willison will give a review of current events.

1936

3

26

Artists and Writers Union first open meeting held at the studio of Dorothy Loeb featured a report on the American Artists Congress, NYC. Ross Moffett presided. Karl Knaths, was the Union’s delegate to the Congress. “The report revealed the surprising degree to which the thousands of artists are awakened to the need of collective action in the defense of the culture against the increasing threats of war, fascism and economic crises.”

1936

5

14

^ The Provincetown Branch of the American League Against War and Fascism will meet at the studio of Dorothy Loeb at 147 ½ Commercial St. Walter Avellar will present a review of George Gunther’s new book, “Inside Europe”. George Willison will give another of his excellent review of current events.

1936

5

29

The Provincetown Branch of the American League Against War and Fascism will meet at the studio of Dorothy Loeb at 147 ½ Commercial St. The main discussion will be “Is Fascism Imminent - Can it Happen Here?”

1936

6

25

The American League Against War and Fascism will meet at the studio of Dorothy Loeb at 358 Commercial St

1936

7

2

Modernist Exhibition begins Season at Art Association. Exhibitors of paintings include… Dorothea Loeb…




Year

Month

Day

Event

1936

7

2

“On Monday evening, at Dorothy Loeb’s Studio, an open meeting of the American League Against War and Fascism was held with 30 people attending. A brief business meeting was followed by a current events talk.

The rest of the evening was devoted to a discussion of the possibilities of Fascism in the United States. Two papers were read - one dealing with the current manifestations of Fascism and setting forth the imminent danger of its development, the other pointing out the ways of combating it.”

1936

8

13

Something novel in art circles is underway this week at the Board of Trade where the work of several of this town’s better known artists is in the “^ Silent Auction” the proceeds are which to go to the Provincetown School Fund for Higher Learning. Among the artists who have contributed their work are …Dorothy Loeb”.

1936

10

15

For the first time, next summer, the exhibition of the Modernists and Conservatives of Provincetown Art Association will be held at the same time instead of different dates. The Art Association was reorganized under Dr. Frederick S. Hammett as President. The jury on the Moderns will include … Dorothy Loeb… The Conservatives will include Charles W. Hawthorne.

1937

1

28

Miss Dorothy Loeb well known artist of Provincetown, has begun work on the murals she has been commissioned to paint in the Falmouth Library (MS). The work is a WPA project. All the available space will be covered with murals depicting beach scenes, fishermen mending nets, repairing boats and lobster pots. She will maintain a Cape Cod motif throughout. Miss Loeb has a nationwide reputation as a painter; as well as a muralist. She served annually on the jury of the Provincetown Art Association. In 1933 and 1934 she worked on murals for the Century of Progress in Chicago.

1937







Dorothy was one of only 5 women (15 men) to exhibit in the “Federal Art in New England 1933-1937” exhibit. May have been at New York City’s Museum of Modern Art.

1937

5

27

Entries close June 19 for submissions for the summer art show 7/4, Dr. Frederick S. Hammett, President announces. Member of the regular jury are Marion Hawthorne (where is Charles?), and the Modern jury consists of… Dorothy Loeb…

1938

5

5

24th Annual Summer Program of the Provincetown Art Association - Experimental Exhibition - no jury, NEW this year! Modern exhibit jury…Blanche Lazzell…Dorothy Loeb…

1938







Loeb exhibited in the Worchester Museum of Art exhibition, “American Painting Today”. Also the Wadsworth Athenaeum, Hartford (CN)

1939

2

20

Postcard from ^ Dorothy Loeb, South Orleans, MA to Anton Van Dereck, Director of Provincetown Art Association, 234 Beacon St., Boston, MA. The information she provided follows. “Present Position: Federal Art Project; Recent Commissions: Decoration Falmonth Community Center; Pictures in what exhibitions: Worcester Biennial Exhibition 1938; Awards and mentions: Medal New England Society of Architects 1938; Do you intend to exhibit in Provincetown this summer? Yes. Remarks: Am always interested in the Association’s constructive work in all lines. Shall be glad to hear about it from time to time. Dorothy Loeb.

1939







Loeb exhibited in the Institute of Modern Art in Boston’s exhibit “Contemporary New England Painters.”




Year

Month

Day

Event

1939

3

23

Provincetown Advocate: “The work of two women. ^ Dorothy Loeb and Blanche Lazzell, both of Provincetown will form an exhibit opening at the Federal Art Gallery, 77 Newbury St., Boston, on March 28 and extending through April 15.

Miss Loeb will show a series of studies of children and grown-ups done in general on a white gesso ground with thin washes of oil color. The style is most personal, while the subject matter shows a keen and essentially normal interest in life.

Miss Lazzell, who is the only woman member of the World’s Fair Graphic Arts jury for Massachusetts, will be represented by a considerable group of block prints.

1939

3

28

^ March 28 - April 15, 1939

WPA exhibition of Dorothy Loeb and Blanche Lazzell, Federal Art Gallery 77 Newbury St. Boston. (Poster is still found on ebay.)

1939

5

4

Governor Leverett Saltonstall accepted the invitation of the Provincetown Art Association, personally extended at the State House by the Association President Thomas G. Blakeman, to be a sponsor of … the Memorial Gallery as a tribute to the late Charles W. Hawthorne, who founded the Cape cod School of Art in Provincetown in 1899. Also sponsoring and endorsing the project are…Dorothy Loeb… (long list of local citizens did NOT include Blanche Lazzell).

1930’s







Henry Hensche opened his Cape Cod School of Art and taught for more than 55 years

~1940







Dorothy living back in Chicago. After the war Dorothy traveled a great deal around the world.

1940







Dorothy wrote articles published in “Friday Magazine”

August 2, 1940 CHILDREN CAN’T ESCAPE War-Torn Governments Can’t Evacuate Them--by Dorothy Loeb.


August 23, 1940

UNDER THE LID OF FASCIST CENSORSHIP--by Dorothy Loeb (about 6 American orphans escaping Franco’s Spain)


November 22, 1940, p15

HAWAII- Its Haunting Beauty Conceals A World Tourists Never See

By Dorothy Loeb

1940

11

14

Artists of Provincetown and Truro are invited by the Provincetown Art association to join the competition for a design to decorate the former Frank Baker house on Bradford street at the base of the Pilgrim Monument, now owned by the Provincetown Light and Power Company. Among the artists invited to join in the competition are…Dorothy Loeb… (no mention of Blanche Lazzell).

1943







Per Ron Glantz at AskArt, Dorothy was in Provincetown summers at least until 1943. She was the artist with the most exhibits ever at the Provincetown Art Association.

WWII







During WWII town was blacked out, artist were away serving in military or working in defense plants. Surrealists Roberto Matta, Arshile Gorky, Max Ernst as did Robert Motherwell.

1944







^ Dorothy is at Hull house as art teacher and painting her own works.

1944







Dorothy has painting, Provincetown Wharf, displayed at Museum of Modern Art (MOMA) N.Y.C.

1945

8

16

Art Institute of Chicago Exhibit - Room of Chicago Art: Works by Antimo Beneduce and Dorothy Loeb




Year

Month

Day

Event

1948

1

29

^ Cape Enders Show In Boston Exhibit Work by Karl Knaths, Blanche Lazzell, Dorothy Loeb and John Whorf - Four nationally known painters who live in Provincetown are among a great number of artists exhibiting their work in the Fifteenth Annual Exhibition of the Boston Society of Independent Artists, in the galleries of Paine’s of Boston, 81 Arlington Street.

…Blanche Lazzell, who has exhibited extensively in France and America, is known for her color wood block prints, is showing an oil painting called “Painting VIII”. ^ Dorothy Loeb, 447 Commercial Street, is showing an oil painting which she calls “The Beach After the Storm”. John Whorf is showing one of is water color paintings called “Fallen Giants”.

1949

7

28

Exhibition includes pastel like oil painting of a “School Room” by Dorothy Loeb… Blanche Lazzell appears with “Spring Flowers”, a small, bold oil on paper.

1949







Forum 49 was a summer-long series of sophisticated programs including exhibits of paintings and programs on architecture, psychoanalysis, poetry, jazz, all held at a gallery at 200 Commercial Street.

1949-1950







Dorothy moves to Mexico…

1940s - 1950s







Provincetown was the summer center of abstract Impressionism represented by Franz Kline, Jackson Pollock, Lee Krasner, Motherwell, Helen Frankenthaler, Fritz Bultman, Hans Hofmann.

1952

10

9

^ Miss Dorothy Loeb, who has been in Mexico for 3 years, is visiting Mr. & Mrs. Reeves Euler

1952

10

23

Miss Dorothy Loeb left for New York. Later she will return to Mexico for the winter.

1950’s - 1960’s







Dorothy returned from Mexico frequently to renew her visa. She would sometimes stay at the home of nephew Sam Lawton and wife Mary, where she would paint until receiving another invitation. Sam’s Mom Eva was Dorothy’s sister. Dorothy’s nephews Sam Lawton and Michael Greenebaum provided her monetary support..

1956







^ Lazzell died in Morgantown, W. V.

1956

2

2

Miss Dorothy Loeb has left to return to Cadereyta de Montes, State of Queretaro, Mexico where she has been painting for several years, after visiting Mrs. I.A. Caliga of Bradford street.

1956-1963







Per Kathryn Petersen, grand niece of Dorothy: She has 4 Dorothy Loeb paintings dated these years that were painted in Mexico. She lived in ^ Cadereyta de Montes, the State of Queretaro de Arteaga in Mexico, travelled around the world on tramp steamers and buses. Lived on a small annuity from her family. Returned to the U.S. in the early 1960’s.

1963

2

7

From Cape Ender Frances Euler of Tuscon, Arizona, comes word of the goings-on in ^ India, where Dorothy Loeb of Truro and Mexico went on an expedition with the Paul Todds of Truro to see Buddhist carvings and paintings of a renowned Indian sculptor and painter.

1971

7

23

Dorothy dies in Los Angeles, California, at a care home at 601 East 32nd Street. San Diego obit names North Haven CT as Dorothy’s home. Other references mention Litchfield CN as Dorothy’s residence.

1977







Dorothy Seckler “Provincetown Painters in the 1890’s - 1970’s” published by the Everson Museum of Art in Syracruse NY, with exhibitions in both cities.

2002

1&2




PAAM held an exhibit: “Loeb & Lazzell, Women on the edge of modernism” Curated by James Bakker.

2002







Blanche Lazzell’s quaint waterfront wharf studio at 351A Commercial Street was razed. It was described as having a wide front porch, overflowing with flowers and potted plants, where for more than 40 years Lazzell worked, entertained guests, and gave $5.00 art lessons.9*

2004

3

12

Lucille Brown Bates Alfireri, 77, dies. She was a model for Dorothy Loeb in Provincetown.




Year

Month

Day

Event

2005







The New Bedford Museum opened a show entitled Provincetown: A Creative Colony, which included works of Loeb and Lazzell and other artists build around the collection of James Bakker and Russell Bigelow.

2005

11




Dorothy’s mural at Lane Technical school is unveiled. Frances Loeb Luebke and Joan Loeb Grampp attend.

2007







The New Bedford show continued at Cape Cod Museum of Art.



^ Appendix 1 - Dorothy Loeb Art Education:

School of the Art Institute of Chicago (AIC)

Paris, France: studied with Fernand Leger, Louis Marcoussis, Henri Martins, and others

Munich, Germany: studied with Heinrich Knirr (born 1862 in Hungary; 1888 established a private drawing school and lived there until 1914 when he moved to Stanberry, a small town 20 miles SW. He painted Hitler’s official portrait in 1937 and died in 1944.)

Charles Hawthorne’s Cape Cod School of Art

Also studied privately with Thomas Woods Stevens

Dorothy taught school at Hull House in Chicago and at AIC


^ Appendix 2 - Artistic Mediums Dorothy utilized:

Oil Paint

Tempera

Watercolor

Ink

Etching / printmaker

Muralist


Appendix 3 - Dorothy’s Studio addresses:

2/6/1936 - 358 Commercial St., Provincetown (Provincetown Advocate)

5/14/1936 - 147 ½ Commercial St. (Provincetown Advocate)

1/29/1948 - 447 Commercial St. (Provincetown Advocate)

158 Commercial St., Provincetown (per painting)

4 Brewster St. (per painting)


^ Appendix 4 - Cities that Dorothy lived in:

Chicago, Illinois

Manhattan, New York

Paris, France

Taos, New Mexico

Munich, Germany

Metairie Louisianna

Truro, Massachusetts

Cadereyta de Montes, State of Queretero in Mexico

S. Orleans, MA, Chatham Road

Los Angeles, California

Litchfield and North Haven, Connecticut





^ Appendix 5 - Exhibitions without a date:

Milwaukee (WI) Institute of Art

Wisconsin Artists Traveling Exhibition

American Girl’s Club, Paris, France


Miscellaneous: Per her obituary, Lucille Brown posed for Dorothy as a girl. Her grandparents came from Sao Migel and Pico Island to Provincetown about 1800.


^

Loeb name meaning


German (Löb) and Jewish (Ashkenazi): meaning “lion” as in the Lion of Judea and often, but not always, indicating they are of the Tribe of Levi, son of Jacob, and performed the ritual washing of the hands of the Kohanim (Priests). Lineage is often represented by a pitcher on their headstone. Since Levite lineage is only passed down through the male line, only the name Loeb can be attributed. There is no documentary evidence that these Loebs were Levites. However, her grandfather on her Mother’s side was a Kohanim, also passing through the male line.


Sources:

1. From Rhein-Hessen to Chicago: Loeb Footprints in Time 1765 - 1997, Fran Loeb Luebke and Hamilton M. Loeb, 1997

2. ProvincetownArtistRegistry.com (maintained by Ewa Nogiec, GalleryEhva.com)

3. Provincetown Art Association and Museum (PAAM) archives of local artists, Dorothy Loeb and Blanche Lazzell files

4. Provincetown Banner on-line archives, www.provincetownbanner.com

5. Loeb and Lazzell: Women on the Edge of Modernism, PAAM exhibition program

6. Research by Kathryn Petersen (step daughter of Bob Longini, son of Gertrude Loeb Longini - Dorothy's sister)

7. AskArt.com, “Biography for Dorothy Loeb”

8. Illinois Women’s Art Project, http://iwa.bradley.edu/?q=artists/DorothyLoeb

9. ebay find: August 2, 1940 Friday Magazine, “Children Can’t Escape: War-Torn Governments Can’t Evacuate Them”

10. Friday Magazine

11. http://www.corbettvsdempsey.com/ex_archive/2005/wpa.html

12. Cape Cod Times, “In the Groove”, by Debbie Forman, January 26, 2002

13. Frances Loeb Luebke correspondence

14. Ellis Island Foundation, Inc, passenger record, Dec 08, 1913

15. I am Provincetown.com, “Provincetown History: The Art Colony, A Brief History”

16. James R. Baker Antiques, Inc. and James Bakker personal correspondence

17. Photo of Dorothy in Mexico in 1965 provided by Denny and Mary Lawton, (Her husband was Sam Lawton, whose
mother was Eva Loeb, was Dorothy's sister.)

18. German Immigrant Artists in America: A Biographical Dictionary, by Peter Merrill, p161

17. Pots of Promise: Mexicans and pottery at Hull House, 1920-1940, by Cheryl Banz, Margaret Strobel



Dorothy Loeb Chronology.doc




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