Records of the auckland museum vol. 47, 2010 icon

Records of the auckland museum vol. 47, 2010



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RECORDS OF THE AUCKLAND MUSEUM Vol. 47, 2010


ABSTRACTS
PLANT NAMES OF THE KALAM (UPPER KAIRONK VALLEY, SCHRADER RANGE, PAPUA NEW GUINEA)

R.O. GARDNER

Abstract. A partial list is given of the plant names of the Kalam people, inhabitants of a lower- to mid-montane region of Madang Province, Papua New Guinea. Approximately 500 names are noted. Cultivar names for food plants, synonyms used only in ritual contexts, and unvouchered names, have mostly been omitted. About 60 of the 500 names are folk-generics that have one or more of their subtaxa named in binomial form. Scientifi c genera and families thus recognized include Cordyline, Elaeocarpus, Freycinetia (but not Pandanus), Homalanthus, Melicope, Piper (shrub spp.), Prunus, Rubus; Cunoniaceae, Lauraceae, Meliaceae, Monimiaceae and Sapindaceae. Herbarium specimens are cited as the basis for this list and for the synonymy between the Kalam and scientific names. Ethnobotanical information and an index (scientific genera to Kalam names) are given.

KEYWORDS: Ethnobotany; indigenous knowledge; Kalam people; Kaironk Valley; New

Guinea.


TIDAL ZONATION OF OSTRACOD AND MICROMOLLUSCAN FAUNAS IN CORALLINE TURF ON THE EAST AND WEST COASTS OF AUCKLAND, NEW ZEALAND

M.S. MORLEY AND B.W. HAYWARD

Abstract. Samples of coralline turf and associated sand were taken from high-, mid- and low-tidal pools on relatively sheltered harbour shores on Auckland’s east coast (Musick Pt) and west coast (Cornwallis). Complete census counts of the live and dead carapaces and shells of ostracods and micromolluscs in replicate 25 cm3 samples resulted in the identification of 80 species of ostracod (59–60 from each coast) and 81 species of mollusc (64 from the east, 47 from the west). Forty five ostracod and 49 mollusc species were found living on the coralline turf or in the associated sediment. Correspondence analysis of the data indicates that biogeographical differences between east and west coast faunas are far stronger in the molluscs than the ostracods. Environmental factors related to tidal elevation (zonation) also seem to be major drivers of the differences in composition of the live faunas in both groups, with the low-tidal faunas more distinct than those from mid- and high-tidal pools. All samples show significant differences between live and dead assemblages. The differences are stronger in ostracods than in the larger, denser-shelled micromolluscs. The differences are mostly attributed to post-mortem wave transport in and alongshore of shells from other, mainly soft sediment habitats. The rapid post-mortem break-up and loss of the thin carapaces of 5 species of common live ostracod also contributes to the differences between live and dead assemblages. Seasonal changes in the composition of the live faunas may also contribute to the live-dead differences but these were not investigated in this study.

KEYWORDS: New Zealand; Waitemata Harbour; Manukau Harbour; Ostracoda; Mollusca; coralline turf; ^ Corallina officinalis; Arthrocardia corymbosa.


J.C. MCLEAN’S COLLECTION OF NEW ZEALAND AND FOREIGN BIRDS’ EGGS

B.J. GILL AND M.J. TAYLOR

Abstract. The egg collection of John Chambers McLean (1871-1918), a farmer from Poverty Bay, New Zealand, is held at Auckland Museum, along with a few study-skins, nest-linings and feather samples that McLean also collected. As currently registered, the birds’ egg collection comprises 380 clutches, including 251 from New Zealand and 125 foreign (from Britain, continental Europe, Australia and the Phoenix Islands, central Pacific Ocean). They were collected between 1881 and 1918. Much of the egg collection is well documented and as voucher specimens they provide important historical breeding records of birds, especially for the eastern North Island of New Zealand, Rocky and Raine Islands (Queensland), and Howland and Hull Islands (Phoenix group). This short analysis, focussed primarily on the size and scope of the egg collection, is intended to draw attention to the McLean material as a resource for natural history research.

KEYWORDS: Poverty Bay; New Zealand; Australia; Phoenix group; birds; eggs; photography; field notebooks.


THE LARGEST RECORDED SPECIMEN OF THE GIANT HEART URCHIN, ^ BRISSUS GIGAS (ECHINOIDEA: BRISSIDAE) [short note]

M.J. CAMERON

[No abstract.]


CERAMIC IMITATION ARM RINGS FOR INDIGENOUS TRADE IN THE SOLOMON ISLANDS 1880 TO 1920

R. RICHARDS

Abstract. After the arrival of foreign traders in the western Solomon Islands, traditional Tridacna shell arm rings became used as money. From about 1880 foreign traders introduced sophisticated imitation rings made of ceramics. These achieved acceptability for a few decades including as ‘small change’ until British and Australian coins came into widespread use about 1920. Few of the ceramic imitations survive.

KEYWORDS: Solomon Islands; Tridacna shell arm rings; imitation ceramic arm rings; trade;

money.


TA-SEDGEMET, THE MUMMY IN THE AUCKLAND WAR MEMORIAL MUSEUM

J. DENNISON

Abstract. This paper presents the findings of a detailed examination of six discs of data images emanating from a CT scan of the mummified remains of Ta-Sedgemet, who lived about 850–575 b.c. She was approximately 32 years of age at the time of her death. She was 156 cm tall, and weighed about 49 kg. Her long bones revealed no evidence of childhood illnesses, and her arteries appeared free of atheromatous tissue. However, she presented a right-side, paratracheal (non-Hodgkin) lymphoma; enflamed mucous membranes in the paranasal sinuses revealed an influenza-type infection; and her dental condition showed evidence of probable suppurative abscesses. Ta-Sedgemet was not a well woman when she died, 2,500 years ago.

KEYWORDS: Egyptian mummy; restoration; stabilisation; spiral CT imaging; gross anatomy.


THE AUCKLAND WAR MEMORIAL MUSEUM COLLECTION OF ADZES FROM PITCAIRN ISLAND, EAST POLYNESIA

M. TURNER

Abstract. A total of 5694 Pitcairn Island adzes from the Auckland War Memorial Museum was analysed. All were made from high quality fine grained basalt found on the island. Adzes were made from flat thin blanks that were sheared from large angular boulders or outcrops. Due to their ideal shape they generally required little flaking. Two functional types dominated: a thin sectioned wide bladed adze for fine shaving, and a wide range of gouges and chisels. These adzes appear to be designed for intricate joinery. It is suggested from this evidence that, on small islands like Pitcairn, timber was perceived as a finite resource that needed careful management. The most important wooden artefact was probably the canoe. Making these from multiple pieces was an effective way of conserving timber. The Pitcairn wood-working adze kit is tailor-made for this purpose.

KEYWORDS: Pitcairn Island; adzes; adze production and function; canoes.


JAMES RICHARD ADAMS WILKES: COLONIAL TRAVELLER, PHOTOGRAPHER, ADMINISTRATOR, ARTIFACT COLLECTOR

R. NEICH

Abstract. James Richard Adams Wilkes (c.1876–c.1940) was born in New Zealand and travelled widely in the North Island as a young man with his camera, being the first to take a bicycle through the Urewera district. After travel through the Pacific, the Far East, Europe and Great Britain in 1902–1904, he worked as a colonial administrator in Nigeria where he photographed local life and collected about 370 artifacts. Moving to Papua New Guinea in 1914 as a colonial officer, he collected at least 200 artifacts and many photographs. In 1928, he presented these to Auckland Museum, which included the surviving 29 photographs, all of Papua New Guinea subjects. In 2003, a fortuitous contact with James’s nephew provided detailed biographical information which is presented here with comment on his collections and more detailed information on his Papua New Guinea photographs.

KEYWORDS: Collector; photographer; colonial administrator; Urewera; Nigeria; Papua New

Guinea.


MICRO-WEAR ANALYSIS OF A MIDDLE BRONZE AGE SWORD BLADE

S. HIGGINS

Abstract. Examination of a Middle Bronze Age broken blade from Auckland Museum reveals evidence of combat damage. Micro-wear analysis of this object shows it was subjected to a number of weapon-to-weapon impact blows in a manner consistent with experimental studies. Burring resulting from impact is found primarily on one flat side of the blade, suggesting it was wielded in a particular way as to always receive damage on the same face. This evidence shows that such blades were used in combat and not only for ceremonial use.

KEYWORDS: Weapon; microscopy; combat damage.



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