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Written and directed by Tyler Perry


For additional publicity material please visit:

www.lionsgatepublicity.com

www.tylerperry.com


Rating: PG-13 (for mature thematic material, domestic violence, sex and drug references)

Running time: 107 mins.


Lionsgate Contact:

Melissa Holloway

Lionsgate

2700 Colorado Avenue

Suite 200

Santa Monica, CA 90404

T: (310) 255-3998

F: (310) 255-3920

E: mholloway@lionsgate.com
^

West Coast Agency:


Cassandra Butcher

CBPR

10061 Riverside Drive

Suite 1019

Toluca Lake, CA 91602

T: (323) 954-0525

F: (323) 954-0526

E: casslives@aol.com

East Coast Agency:

Janice Roland

Steven Beeman

Falco PR

850 Seventh Avenue

Suite 1005

New York, NY 10019

T: (212) 445-7100

F: (212) 445-0623

E: janiceroland@falcoink.com

E: stevenmbeeman@falcoink.com



THE CAST


Madea

Joe

Brian..………………………………………………………………..……TYLER PERRY


Carlos……………………………………………………………..BLAIR UNDERWOOD


Victoria……………………………………………………………….LYNN WHITFIELD


Frankie………………………………………………………………...…BORIS KODJOE


Issac………………………………………………………………..…HENRY SIMMONS


Vanessa………………………………………………...LISA ARRINDELL ANDERSON


May……………………………………………………………… MAYA ANGELOU


Lisa……………………………………………………………….….ROCHELLE AYTES


Milay Jenay Lori………………………………………………………...JENIFER LEWIS


Donna……………………………………………………………….……TANGI MILLER


Nikki……………………………………………………………………...KEKE PALMER


Myrtle……………………………………………………………………CICELY TYSON


Full cast credits found on Page 26


^ THE FILMMAKERS


Written and Directed by…………………………………………………..TYLER PERRY


Produced by…………………………………………………………. TYLER PERRY

…………………………………………………………………….…REUBEN CANNON


Executive Producer………………………………………………….MIKE PASEORNEK


Co-Producers……………………………………………………….………MIKE UPTON

…………………………………………………………………….…...ROGER M. BOBB


Director of Photography……………………………….…………TOYOMICHI KURITA


Editor……………………………………………………………...JOHN CARTER A.C.E.


Production Designer………………………………………………………INA MAYHEW


Costume Designer………………………………………………………KEITH G. LEWIS


Music by………………………………………………………………….TYLER PERRY

……………………………………………………………………………. ELVIN ROSS


Music Supervisors…………………………………………………….……JOEL C. HIGH

……………………………………………………………………...CAMARA KAMBON


Casting by………………………………………………………………..KIM WILLIAMS


Full filmmaker credits found on Page 28


SYNOPSIS


Based upon the acclaimed stage production, TYLER PERRY’S MADEA'S FAMILY REUNION continues the adventures of southern matriarch Madea begun in the hit film DIARY OF A MAD BLACK WOMAN.


An unstoppable force of nature, Madea may have finally taken on more than she can chew. She has just been court ordered to be in charge of NIKKI, a rebellious runaway, her nieces LISA and VANESSA are suffering relationship trouble, and through it all she has to organize her family reunion.


As the reunion approaches, secrets are revealed and tensions rise. Madea must use every tactic in her arsenal to not only keep the peace, but keep her family together.


The cast of TYLER PERRY’S MADEA’S FAMILY REUNION includes Tyler Perry, Blair Underwood, Lynn Whitfield, Boris Kodjoe, Henry Simmons, Lisa Arrindell Anderson, Maya Angelou, Rochelle Aytes, Jenifer Lewis, Tangi Miller, Keke Palmer, and Ms. Cicely Tyson. TYLER PERRY’S MADEA’S FAMILY REUNION was written and directed by Tyler Perry. The film is produced by Tyler Perry and Reuben Cannon.


^ ABOUT THE PRODUCTION


Lionsgate’s TYLER PERRY’S MADEA’S FAMILY REUNION marks writer/director/actor Tyler Perry’s highly anticipated follow-up to his debut hit, DIARY OF A MAD BLACK WOMAN. Based on his acclaimed stage production, TYLER PERRY’S MADEA’S FAMILY REUNION brings back Perry’s beloved matriarch, Madea, as she struggles to resolve mounting tensions within her family, all in anticipation of a massive family reunion. With his trademark combination of riotous, irreverent humor and dramatic intensity, Perry once again delivers a story that is rife with larger-than-life characters, rousing gospel music and inspiring messages about love, forgiveness and family.

“MADEA’S FAMILY REUNION is about family and the things we go through as family,” says Perry. “It’s about how secrets that are hidden and buried have to be uncovered for any healing to take place. It’s also about laughing yourself to that place of healing.”

Broader in scope than DIARY OF A MAD BLACK WOMAN, Perry’s new film examines an extensive ensemble of related characters, each engaged in a life-changing relationship: Madea struggles to forge a real bond with Nikki, a rebellious runaway who has been ordered to her care; Lisa, Madea’s niece, is questioning her upcoming marriage to Carlos, her abusive fiancé; and Vanessa, Lisa’s half-sister, is grappling with her mother’s life-long animosity towards her, while tentatively exploring a relationship with Frankie, a handsome bus driver.

Already a firmly established star of urban theater, Perry became a bona fide film star with the release of DIARY OF A MAD BLACK WOMAN in movie theaters last year. His devoted theater audience, built through years of touring and creative output, helped push DIARY, made on a modest $5 million budget, to a domestic gross of over $60 million. With both old and new fans clamoring for more, Perry and his producing partner Reuben Cannon saw TYLER PERRY’S MADEA’S FAMILY REUNION as the logical follow-up to DIARY, this time with Perry in the director’s chair.

“The genius of Tyler is that he’s so in touch with his audience from all of his touring. He knows what they want,” says Reuben Cannon. “Even though it’s true to the play, the film version of MADEA is so much bigger and better than the play in terms of the characters . We expect the fans to be just over the moon about this.”  

“Tyler has transitioned beautifully from stage to screen,” adds executive producer Mike Paseornek. “He’s found a way to capture all the spirit and humor and energy that have made his plays hits and make it all work on screen. This film is a real triumph for him.”

Perry sees this second film as a welcome opportunity to add depth to his characters, particularly Madea, the tough-talking grandma played by Perry in a padded dress and layers of prosthetics. “Madea’s dropped the guns and the pot-smoking, and has become more of a voice that helps people with their issues,” he says. “She’s a figure who helps bridge generations and hold them together.”

“You can’t make a Tyler Perry movie without Madea,” says Cannon. “Audiences want to adopt her. She’s relatable because everyone has a Madea in his or her family on some level. She says things a lot of us would like to say but don’t.”

Uncle Joe, the lascivious, flatulent brother to Madea who is also played by Perry, also returns to deliver a handful of crass, sidesplitting moments. Despite the four hours it takes in the make-up chair to transform into Uncle Joe, Perry admits he’s his favorite character to play. “Uncle Joe is just so authentic and consistent to who he is,” says Perry. “When I play him, I get to say whatever I want to say. Whatever comes up, comes up.”

Based on Perry’s growing fame and the quality of his writing, he and Cannon had no trouble attracting a talented, and notably attractive, cast for the project. As the abusive Carlos, Blair Underwood (”L.A. Law,” SET IT OFF, RULES OF ENGAGEMENT) brings genuine menace and complexity to a role that might have been one-note in lesser hands. “I love playing the bad guy,” admits Underwood. “It’s not only interesting for me to play, but hopefully it’s more interesting and more unnerving for the audience to try to understand who Carlos is and why he is the way he is.”

“I’ve always wanted to work with Blair, and finally the timing was right,” says Perry. “I have a tremendous amount of respect for him. He’s been working forever, but I still think he’s a hugely underrated actor in Hollywood.”

Perry was still writing the script for MADEA when he realized that the part of Victoria, the imperious, materialistic mother, should go to Lynn Whitfield, an actress he has admired since her portrayal of Josephine Baker in the television movie “The Josephine Baker Story.” “When I wrote the scene where Vanessa tells Victoria, ‘You’re gonna rot in hell’ and Victoria replies, ‘I vacation there,’ I suddenly thought, Lynn has to play this,” remembers Perry. “She’s so intense and so powerful. She’s just incredible.”

“Victoria is just desperately evil and so deeply afraid of not having,” says Whitfield of her character. “It's always great to play these high sea roles. They’re so exaggerated and severe that you can bring a lot to them and move yourself out of the way. It’s very freeing.”

For the half-sisters Vanessa and Lisa, the two characters who form the heart of the film, Perry discovered two relatively unknown actresses, Lisa Arrindell Anderson and Rochelle Aytes. As the headstrong, bohemian Vanessa who is disowned by her resentful mother, Anderson demonstrates a fierce intelligence and strength onscreen. “A lot of what's written for African American women is all surface,” says Anderson. “But with Vanessa, I couldn't ask for a better character to play. I'm so thankful.”

“Lisa is amazing, intelligent, and so beautiful,” says Perry. “I had never heard of her before the casting process began. But when I saw her audition tape, I said, ‘There she is. That’s Vanessa.’”

“I’m so impressed by her performance and how energetic and truthful she is,” says co-star Boris Kodjoe. “She's a genius.”

As Lisa, the abused wife-to-be who must find the strength to stand up to both her abusive husband and her tyrannical mother, Aytes is achingly vulnerable, subtly charting her character’s difficult transformation from timid victim to independent woman. “Lisa’s struggle is with whether or not she deserves somebody good in her life,” says Aytes. “She’s always lived for her mother, and she goes through this film trying to own up to what she wants.”

“Rochelle has this innocence about her,” says Perry. “She had done only one movie before MADEA, and she definitely found it challenging to be in such a big and difficult role, but she nailed every beat of Lisa’s journey.”

Boris Kodjoe (LOVE AND BASKETBALL, BROWN SUGAR), who stars as Frankie, an artistically inclined bus driver who manages to break Vanessa out of her shell, was another young actor with whom Perry was eager to work. Also rounding out the cast are Keke Palmer, who plays Nikki, Madea’s headstrong foster child, Jennifer Lewis as the wedding planner Milay Jenay Lori, and Tangi Miller and Henry Simmons as Donna and Isaac, a young couple struggling with a painful divorce. Audiences will have the opportunity to watch Perry perform without prosthetics in the role of Brian, a returning character from DIARY who is a lawyer and relative of Madea’s family.

Of all the cast, however, TYLER PERRY’S MADEA’S FAMILY REUNION is distinguished most notably by the presence of two iconic African-American women: Academy Award ® nominee and multiple Emmy Award winner Cicely Tyson (SOUNDER, “The Autobiography of Miss Hane Pittman”), and revered poet, activist and actor, Dr. Maya Angelou.

Says Kodjoe, “Dr. Maya Angelou and Ms. Cicely Tyson are living legends, heroes, trailblazers. These two women have changed the face of Hollywood. They've changed the face of this culture so tremendously by inspiring millions of people to reach their potential.”

For Perry, having both women on set together was a humbling, inspiring experience. “It was just amazing to hear Cicely Tyson and Dr. Angelou talk about being in a play together 40 years ago,” recalls Perry. “Dr. Angelou's life span goes from Billie Holiday and Duke Ellington on up to Oprah. And for me, to be touched by that tradition of black artists is an amazing thing.”

At the titular family reunion, Tyson appears as Myrtle, an elderly relative who, alongside Dr. Angelou’s May, delivers a rousing speech to her extended family about their responsibilities as a family and as African-Americans. Says Underwood, “She was saying, ‘Young men of color, where are we? Take your place. Remember where we came from. Remember so we can know where we're going.’”

Adding immeasurably to the scene’s resonance is its setting. The reunion sequence was shot on a former plantation, with Tyson addressing her family from the steps of the plantation’s slave quarters. The result is a powerful and resonant evocation of African-American history, identity and civil rights progress. “It was amazing,” says Perry. “Nobody was moving. The extras were crying. It was spellbinding. When it was over, it was complete quiet. Just complete quiet.”

“That speech was so simple and clear and yet profound, and not at all preachy,” remembers Whitfield. “I just felt like, ‘Yes, this is so great. Somebody's finally saying this out loud. It'll be on screen. It'll all be said.’”

Perry is passionate about mending the apparent disconnect that today’s youth have with older generations, a cause for which he feels particularly suited. “There are certain people who are able to stand in the middle, who can reach these very, very young people and can reach our seniors,” says Perry. “Too often today we let go of older things. We throw them away. But elders have so much wisdom if we just listen.”

Dr. Angelou is also featured during the climactic wedding sequence, in which she recites a poem she wrote specifically for the film. “It’s a love poem called ‘In and Out of Time,’” says Dr. Angelou. “I wrote it since a number of young black people would have us believe that white people make love and black people just have sex. And it's not true. So I wrote about romance.”

“She just lets out this barrage of incredible words that motivate and lift you,” says Perry of Dr. Angelou. “When she leaves your presence, you know she's been there.”

The film’s wedding sequence was designed by Perry to rival any other wedding ever put to film. Staged in a lavish tent with angels floating from the rafters, the scene features Dr. Angelou, as well as R&B star Johnny Gill singing an original song written by Perry. “I wanted to make it really, really incredible,” says Perry. “My production designer, Ina Mayhew, is an incredible artist. And she got it instantly. When I walked into the tent, I saw my dream.”

When asked about the impressive feat of performing three different roles during production, two of which involved heavy prosthetic make-up, and making his feature directorial debut, Perry is characteristically humble. “I had a great team of people working with me who totally understood my vision,” he says. “I feel like now that I’ve finished my first film, I’m ready to direct my first film.”

For the first two weeks of production, Perry focused solely on scenes in which he didn’t appear as an actor, allowing himself to wet his teeth as a director. During the remaining weeks, he was often directing in full make-up as either Madea or Uncle Joe. “There was a lot of laughing and snickering at first,” says Perry. “But once I got my breasts past the monitors I was okay.”

“Tyler’s got an ease about him,” says Underwood. “The scene at the plantation, he was playing three different characters, working with two iconic figures in Cicely Tyson and Maya Angelou, and dealing with two hundred background artists, and in the face of all of that, he was calm and easy. He’s collaborative and listens to other people's ideas and embraces them.”

Adds Kodjoe, “Tyler is an actor's director. He loves to talk to you about your character. And the set is just – you can feel the harmony, you can feel the positive energy. Tyler is responsible for that.”

When she is acting with Perry, Whitfield doesn’t even hope to measure up against him. “He's a huge scene-stealer, that's what he is,” she says, laughing. “Being in a scene with Tyler Perry as Madea or Joe is like being in a scene with a child or a dog. They say, you know, forget it. You're never going to win. He's amazing.”

With such a varied, talented cast and rich storylines, TYLER PERRY’S MADEA’S FAMILY REUNION is poised to satisfy Perry’s loyal fan base and win him many new admirers. Like his previous work, the film provokes laughter and tears, and manages to impart vital life lessons without heavy-handedness.

“The themes that Tyler writes about are classic themes: revenge, repentance, forgiveness, the victory of the human spirit over adversity,” says Whitfield. “They are dramatic themes, but he communicates them to his audience in a heightened, funny, and very human way.”

“I hope this is a crossover work that will urge people to look at their families,” says Dr. Angelou. “That is whites and blacks and Asians, Spanish speaking, Native Americans, gays, straights, pretty and plain. We can always look back into our families, two generations, four generations, last week and see someone we admire.”

For Perry, MADEA develops a theme that has been a through-line in his work for the past thirteen years: forgiveness. “If you can forgive the wrongs of your past and of your parents, who were only doing what they knew, then you can look forward,” he says. “Apart from my personal relationships, that message has been the passion of my life.”

And, as with every Tyler Perry experience, audiences should expect to have a good time. Says Reuben Cannon, “I think the great thing about Tyler Perry is that you always, always leave the theater feeling better than when you came in. It’s true of his plays and I believe this film will provide the same experience.”


^ "MADEA" MABEL SIMMONS

The Abridged Biography


Madea, whose real name is Mabel Simmons, was born according to most accounts in rural Greensburg, Louisiana in 1937, but others show her age as older. Some have speculated it might have been related to attempts to qualify earlier for Social Security benefits. She is also fondly remembered by some as "Delicious" from a brief but popular

career working at what was politely termed in the late 1950's and early 1960's as “exotic dancing."


Madea had strict upbringing under her mother, Big Mabel Murphy, the original Madea who her daughter calls "Madea Over The Top." She had to start doing household chores from the age of six months. "I'm Madea Lite compared to her," she once explained.


Since moving to New Orleans in her high school years, Madea has been in the neighborhood, watching out and speaking her mind, what she calls "keeping it real." According to her friend Tyler Perry, "She has a heart of gold but has a tough exterior and takes no crap. Madea is the kind of person who will beat the hell out of you one minute and take you to the doctor the next."


Madea has one child, Cora, who is referred to as the biggest blessing and the biggest regret of her life. Madea's first date was going to her high school prom with her neighbor Brown. She had too much to drink, and one thing led to another. Nine months later, Cora was born.


When her tips as a stripper started to dwindle, Madea had a very short career working for a company that made protective paper toilet seat covers, but her outspokenness did not prove popular with the front office. She turned to the business of husbands, believing that marriage is for life, that is, the lifetime of her husbands. All eight of them died of mysterious causes soon after heated arguments. Thanks to life insurance policies, Madea has lived comfortably but frugally over the last few decades.


The fact that so many people like to come to Madea for advice is the reason why you've heard of her today. Madea once said, "Every time I'm out in front of people, they ask me for advice. 'Madea, what should I do about this? Madea, what should I do about that?' I tell people I've got problems of my own, but for some reason, they keep asking and they seem to like to listen to the advice that I've got to give."


So, whether she's talking about the miraculous uses of Vaseline, tips on the art of flirting or the hidden benefits of a deep fried diet, Madea's voice is heard far beyond her neighborhood today. Her large body can be found on theater stages, in motion pictures and even on the cover of best selling books.


Her motto is "Life is sometimes hard, and you have to laugh your way through it."


^ ABOUT THE FILMMAKERS


TYLER PERRY (Director, Writer, Composer, “Madea”, “Joe”, “Brian”)


Tyler Perry—writer, producer, director, and actor extraordinaire—emerged from the poverty-stricken streets of New Orleans to his multi-million dollar mansion in Atlanta. But the story to be told is his journey from homelessness to bliss.


This rags-to-riches tale is astonishing and inspirational to all. Tyler’s younger days were troubled, and he suffered from endless abuse from his father. Later in life, the dejection and rejection caused him to do some soul-searching. In 1992, inspired to write by Oprah Winfrey, he penned a series of letters to himself in an effort to find catharses for his childhood pain. Those same letters would eventually evolve to become Tyler’s first hit musical, I Know I’ve Been Changed. His humble spirit and relationship with God kept him faithful and obedient. He believed God was calling him to share his story with as many as possible, to help and heal others like him. In his words, Tyler learned real forgiveness deep within—a type of forgiveness that leads to success in one’s soul. Perry chose the stage life as the vehicle. It was definitely a learning process of hard work. But now Perry has raised the bar tremendously on the way people perceive and attend urban theatre selling out to millions across the country.


Looking back through his illustrious career thus far, Perry ingeniously created the sixty- eight-year-old character Mabel “Madea” Simmons. In 1997, his first production, ^ I Know I’ve Been Changed, gave theater its facelift. It was followed by Woman, Thou Art Loosed and Behind Closed Doors, both collaborations with Bishop T.D. Jakes. In 2000, he wrote I Can Do Bad All By Myself and introduced Madea,successfully making her a household name to thousands across the country. Soon after, Diary of a Mad Black Woman, Family Reunion and Class Reunion all starred Tyler Perry as “Madea. Two of his projects, Why Did I Get Married with Grammy Award-winner Kelly Price and Meet the Browns, have toured successfully without him while Tyler focused on new ventures. He has changed the urban genre of theatre, thus touching and inspiring the lives of many. His legacy encounters mega-sellout performances throughout the country.


In December 2004, Tyler wrote and produced “Madea’s Christmas Play for Trinity Broadcasting Network (TBN). The program netted the highest ratings for the local broadcast and 3rd highest in TBN history!


His new ventures included his first major motion picture. The screen adaptation of his stageplay, DIARY OF A MAD BLACK WOMAN, was the #1 movie at the box office. The film starred Kimberly Elise, Shemar Moore, Steve Harris, Cicely Tyson and, of course, Tyler Perry who played three roles. The success of the movie surprised Hollywood movie moguls and theater critics who knew little or nothing of “Tyler Perry”. (Tyler also filmed a stage production of Diary of a Mad Black Woman, released in February 2005.) The current tour, Madea Goes to Jail, is the best stage production yet. To date, it has sold out every theater since January 2005.


Tyler has made several major television appearances, the highlights of which were his two guest appearances on “The Oprah Winfrey Show,” where he talked about the power of forgiveness and his new movie. He was also a guest on ABC’s “Good Morning America” and “20/20.” He was nominated for the prestigious Helen Hayes Award for Excellence in Theatre and for MTV’s Breakthrough Man of the Year Award.


Tyler has been featured in such publications as ^ Black Enterprise; Ebony; Essence; JET, Sister to Sister; and was a recipient of 2004 Black Business Professionals Entrepreneur of the Year as well as many others.


“People look at the money or the resources I have achieved but it is far better than that. The laughter, values, wisdom, and spirituality that I am bringing to the productions are worth far more than what I am earning.”


“Remember that life is short and my motto is “Laugh your way through it!”


^ REUBEN CANNON (Producer)


Producer Reuben Cannon's background in film and television is in casting. In these roles he has worked with some of the biggest names in film and TV, including Bruce Willis, Oprah Winfrey, Will Smith, Spike Lee and Whoopi Goldberg.


After attending Southeast City College in Chicago, Cannon moved to Los Angeles. Cannon began his career in Hollywood in the mailroom at Universal Studios. This position led to him becoming a casting director and then he served as head of television casting at Warner Brothers.


Some of Cannon's producing credits include last year's WOMAN THOU ART LOOSED, based on the book by Bishop T.D. Jakes; LOVE DON'T COST A THING with Nick Cannon; DANCING IN SEPTEMBER; DOWN IN THE DELTA, directed by Dr. Maya Angelou; Spike Lee's GET ON THE BUS; and THE WOMEN OF BREWSTER PLACE with Oprah Winfrey and Cicely Tyson.


Among his casting credits are JOHNSON FAMILY VACATION, DELIVER US FROM

EVA, THE BROTHERS, THE COLOR PURPLE, WHY DO FOOLS FALL IN LOVE, A SOLDIER STORY, WHAT'S LOVE GOT TO DO WITH IT?, and THE JOSEPHINE BAKER STORY, and "The Bernie Mac Show".


Cannon has received an Honorary Doctorate of Human Letters from Morehouse College. His work was recognized at the 2002 NAACP Image Awards when Daimler/Chrysler honored him with the Behind the Lens Award for his contributions to both film and TV.


^ MIKE UPTON (Co-Producer)


Mike Upton today is one of Hollywood's most prolific independent producers. After graduating from The University of Texas he began his career interning with FilmDallas, producers of such independent hits as "Da," "Kiss of the Spider Woman" and "Trip to Bountiful."


In 1987 Upton headed to Los Angeles where he worked for legendary low-budget movie producer Roger Corman, best known for his long tradition of finding and fostering new talent. Corman recognized Upton's ability and quickly tapped him to run his Venice, California studio. Soon Upton was supervising the production of twenty features per year.


In 1996 with more than sixty pictures under his belt, Upton began to produce independently. He ventured into international waters making the successful Fox Family television dramas "Au Pair" and "Au Pair 2", as well as "After the Storm" (a USA Network drama with Benjamin Bratt, which won top honors at multiple festivals including New York and City of Angels).


Other notable producing credits include "Casper: A Spirited Beginning" which became and remains the best-selling non-Disney video of all time; "Michael Jordan: An American Hero" for Fox Family Channel; "Addams Family Reunion" for Twentieth Century Fox; theatrical features "Boat Trip" with Cuba Gooding Jr. and "Down in the Valley" with Edward Norton.


In 2000 Upton began to produce for Lionsgate on such projects as "Wonderland" with Val Kilmer, "Happy Endings" with Lisa Kudrow, "Undiscovered," and the soon-to-be-released "Akeelah and the Bee" with Angela Bassett and Laurence Fishburne. He served as co-producer on the 2004 smash "Diary of a Mad Black Woman".


Currently Upton resides as 2929 Productions' Senior Vice President of Production on such films as "Good Night, Good Luck", "Turistas" and "Fast Track".


^ KEITH G. LEWIS (Costume Designer)


Keith Lewis received his graduate degree from the North Carolina School of the Arts. He began his career designing costumes in theater with work on such shows as “The Miracle Worker,” “Hamlet,” “Chicago,” “1940’s Radio Hour,” “A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum” and “Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat.”


Lewis served as Wardrobe Supervisor on the films YOUNG GUNS, GRUMPY OLD MEN, GEORGE OF THE JUNGLE and HBO Films’ BOYCOTT.


He worked as the costume designer for MEN AT WORK with brothers Emilio Estevez and Charlie Sheen, UNSHACKLED with Morgan Freeman and FIRST OFFENSE with Joan Severance and Corbin Bernsen.


In addition to his design work, Lewis has returned to the North Carolina School of the Arts to serve as an instructor and guest designer. He has also been the Resident Costume Designer and Instructor at East Carolina University.


^ BILL JOHNSON (Prosthetic Make-Up)


Bill “Splat” Johnson has been working in the film industry for over 20 years. He began his make-up skills working in super eight features back in the late seventies. He then moved on to creating effects for student films at the University of Georgia. After graduating from college with a BFA in graphic design, he was accepted in Dick Smith’s Advanced Professional Make-Up Course. It was during his enrollment that he got his first major make-up effects job, doing SLEEPAWAY CAMPS 2 & 3. He has now worked on over 30 movies including THE PATRIOT, EIGHT LEGGED FREAKS, HOODLUM, IN DREAMS, and OCTOBER SKY.


In addition to his make-up effects talents, Johnson is also a graphic designer with the Horror Channel and has moved into directing some of his own horror projects.


^ ELVIN ROSS (Composer)


NAACP Nominated composer ELVIN ROSS (Music Score, Original Songs, Musical Director) has composed music for an extraordinary number of hugely successful urban theatrical productions, including Tyler Perry’s “I Know I’ve Been Changed,” “ I Can Do Bad All By Myself,” “ Diary Of A Mad Black Woman,”  “Madea’s Family Reunion,” “Meet The Brown’s,” “ Madea Goes To Jail,” Bishop T.D.  Jakes’ “Woman Thou Art Loosed” and NAACP-nominated “Behind Closed Doors.”


Within the last few years, Elvin has added several more mega accomplishments to his resume: Creator and Executive Producer of the Telly Award Winning -Gospel Dream Talent Search. Gospel Dream is the gospel music industry answer to American Idol. The television special broke a household viewer ship record on Black Entertainment Television (BET) in 2003 garnering over two million viewers. He produced the Gospel Dream special in association with his company, SONHO Entertainment in which he is the CEO. In 2005, Elvin composed a memorably melodic movie score for Tyler Perry’s “Diary Of A Mad Black Woman” for Lionsgate.


Working on a vast array of projects, Elvin has been achieving success and wining industry awards for over ten years.  Some of his honors and achievements include but are not limited to:  2001 NAACP Urban Theatre Award Nominee for “Best Musical Director” for Bishop T.D. Jakes’ “Behind Closed Doors”; Winner of the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Foundation, Inc. award for outstanding musical contributions, and received two proclamations recognized by St. Charles Parish, LA for outstanding musical achievement.

Raised just on the outskirts of New Orleans, Louisiana, Elvin was surrounded by the influence of the city’s great history of music that encompassed jazz, gospel and rhythm and blues. He contributes the nurturing of his musical gift to his mother, Frozine Francis, who is a classically trained pianist.

A new resident of Atlanta (after suffering the lost of his family’s home in New Orleans), Elvin is married to the lovely Jasmine Ross, the proud father of Elvin Ross, Jr. and cherish the memory of his beloved daughter, Kai L’ani Ross.





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