Imagining the Future of Exercise Physiology icon

Imagining the Future of Exercise Physiology



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AMERICAN SOCIETY OF EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGISTS

10th ASEP Annual Meeting

April 10-12, 2008


___________________________________________________________


THURSDAY, April 10, 2008


7:00 – 9:00 pm Board of Directors Meeting


FRIDAY, April 11, 2008


7:30 – 9:30 am Registration


SESSION 1 – PROFESSIONALISM


8:00 – 8:05 am Welcome to the 10th ASEP Annual Meeting


Lonnie Lowery, PhD, RD, LD

ASEP President

Associate Professor of Nutrition

University of Akron

Akron, OH


A. Lecture


8:05 – 8:20 am Imagining the Future of Exercise Physiology


Tommy Boone, PhD, MPH, FASEP, EPC

Professor and Chair, Department of Exercise Physiology, The College of St. Scholastica, Duluth, MN


My intention is not to rehearse what I've said in past meetings. Rather I want to encourage you to use your powers of imagination. I also want to suggest that we should not allow the fine points of dispute to distract us from the many other weighty issues that lie before us and that require all-hands-on-deck attention. We are all eagles in a chicken world. Or, should I say, "We are all exercise physiologists in an exercise science world." The ASEP leadership believes that when we look to the ASEP initiatives and perspectives, we find our true identity. And as we find out who we really are, we begin to do and be as "Board Certified Exercise Physiologists." The ASEP organization is here to stay, regardless of the challenges before it. Can the leaders be sure of success? No, but if you and others think you can, and if you never, never give up, there can be success. This has already been demonstrated in so many of the St. Scholastica's EPCs. Where there is a dream, there is hope, and where there is hope, there is faith, and faith (it is said is the substance of what we are hoping for). Creative visualization is the ability to use your imagination. To see images in our minds and make them come true will put us on the right path to financial stability, professional credibility, and personal satisfaction. If you are a Board Certified EP, you are not like the mass-produced individuals with non-exercise physiology certifications. However, please appreciate there is a price. Vision always demands a cost. We should heed the advice of Clementine Paddleford, "Never grow a wishbone, daughter, where your backbone ought to be."


8:20 – 8:40 am^ Exercise Physiology Internships: The Role of the Board-Certified Exercise Physiologist


Patrick Ayres, MA, EPC, CSCS

Exercise Physiologists and Athletic Manager, Minneapolis Club, Minneapolis, MN


As ASEP grows, many EP programs increasingly understand the need to change in order to meet ASEP’s accreditation criteria. In addition, exercise physiology internships sites need to adapt to the ever-changing health and fitness industry. This presentation will explore my experiences as an internship coordinator and the challenge in creating a quality experience in an evolving field. Although interns don’t all come from EP programs, the internship host site can use this opportunity to expose (non-EP) students the complexity and scope of practice within the exercise physiology field. In addition, EP students deserve an experience which is challenging and also complimentary to their academic preparation. Maximizing the internship experience is a shared responsibility amongst the academic institution, the student, and the host facility. Going forward, exercise physiology internships hosts should re-evaluate their program. Does it make the student more prepared for the real world? What are the selection criteria? Should an EP internship take only EP students? As EPCs, the burden of responsibility is on us to grow and strengthen our foundation. This can be done either by cultivating young professionals in quality EP programs, or making a clear differentiation between board-certified EPs and other health and fitness professionals.


SESSION 2 – RESEARCH and LECTURE


8:40 – 8:45 am Introduction

Robert Robergs, PhD, FASEP, EPC

Professor, Exercise Physiology and Biochemistry

Director, Exercise Physiology Laboratories

Exercise Science Program

The University of New Mexico

Albuquerque, NM


^ A. Research


8:45 – 9:00 am Motivations and Barriers to Exercise among College Students


Laura Brudzynski and William P. Ebben, PhD, MSSW, CSCS*D1

Marquette University Departments of Psychology and 1Physical Therapy/Program in Exercise Science, Milwaukee, WI


Introduction: The majority of Americans are overweight or obese and do not exercise (3). For those who begin an exercise program, 50% stop after 6 months (3). Thus, understanding motives and barriers to exercise is important (3). Comprehensive research investigating these issues is restricted to a Canadian study conducted over a decade ago (1). Methods: This study included a survey of 4001 randomly selected students from a large Midwestern university. This survey was validated through input from an advisory group of allied health professionals, pilot testing with allied health professionals, and pilot testing with a sub-sample of the population to be surveyed. The survey assessed background information, exercise participation rates, motives and barriers for those who exercise, and barriers and potential motives to exercise for those who do not exercise. The survey contained fixed response and open-ended questions which were content analyzed (2). The researchers were experienced with qualitative methods research and analysis. The study was approved by the university review board. Results: One thousand forty four of 4001 (26.1%) people responded to the survey. Participants ranged in age from 17-55 years old, with a mean of 20.53 ± 5.77 years. Participants included 689 (66.0%) women and 355 (34.0%) men, from 32 of states (97.89%) and 17 countries. Most (76.8%) participants reported exercising whereas 23.2% did not. Participants who exercised averaged 220.4 minutes of exercise per week. Participants identified a variety of motives for exercising with the most common characterized as “general health,” “maintain fitness,” “stress reduction,” “enjoyment /pleasure,” and “feel good/better.” For those who exercise, 76.1% wished they exercised more. The most common circumstances that would lead those who exercise to exercise more included, “more time,” “less school work,” “more motivation,” “fewer time commitments,” and “sport to train for.” A variety of barriers to exercise for those who do not currently exercise were described including “no time,” “laziness,” “other priorities,” “no motivation,” and “no energy/tired.” For those who did not currently exercise, 88.8% wish they would. Potential circumstances that would lead non-exercisers to begin were typified by responses such as, “more time,” “workout partner or group,” “fewer demands,” more motivation,” and “better facility location.” A variety of other motives and barriers were identified. Results: The survey response rate of 26.1% was at the high end of the typical range for email surveys (4). Previous research in this area is dated and limited to closed ended questions, thus restricting the identification of potential motives and barriers to exercise (1). Results of the present study confirm the role of limited time, motivation, and energy as barriers to exercise as previously reported (1). The present study also identifies numerous barriers to exercise previously not reported (1,3). The most common examples include “laziness,” and “other priorities.” Conclusions: Exercise professionals are encouraged to understand the motives and barriers to exercise so they can best assist their clientele in addressing these issues, thus increasing exercise participation and reducing the drop-out rate. References: 1. Canadian Fitness and Lifestyle Research Institute. Progress in Prevention. Barriers to Physical Activity. p.1-4, 1996. 2. Patton, M.Q. Qualitative Evaluation and Research Methods. Newbury Park, California. Sage Publications. 1990. 3. Weinberg, R.S. et al. Foundations of Sport and Exercise Psychology (4th ed). Champaign, IL. Human Kinetics. 2007. 4. Yun, G.W. and C.W. Trumbo. Comparative response to a survey executed by post, e-mail, and web form. J. Computer Mediated Communication. 6(1):1-19. 2000. Acknowledgment: The authors wish to thank the study participants as well as Mary Pat Pheil and Mykl Novak of the Marquette University’s Office of Communication and Information Technology Services, respectively.


9:00 – 9:15 am ^ Sport Science and Sport Performance: An Overview of the Midwestern State University Program

Dr. Frank B. Wyatt1, and Gary Achterberg

1Chair, Department of Kinesiology, Midwestern State University, Wichita Falls, TX

Introduction: The application of exercise science to sport performance is lacking. Midwestern State University’s (MWSU) Cycling Team (Wichita Falls, TX) was named the collegiate program of the year for 2004 by USA-Cycling and placed 6th nationally for overall team points in 2007. The team history includes 21 national cycling championships since the team was formed in 1989 -- most recently, the men's road race and women's criterium at the 2007 Collegiate Road Cycling Championships. There is a strong relationship between the team and the University’s Department of Kinesiology. The purpose of this presentation is to show the association between the Department of Kinesiology and the Cycling Team at MWSU. Methods: Each year cyclists are tested in the Cardio-Pulmonary Lab within the department. These tests consist of the following: (1) cycle ergometry (VelotronTM) for oxygen consumption (VO2, ParvoMedicsTM) and ventilatory threshold utilizing the Australian Institute for Sport (AIS) protocol, as well as power (watts) utilizing the 30 s Wingate Test; (2) blood lactate (mM) to determine lactate threshold and specific lactate levels at differing workloads; (3) ECG for heart rate (b·min-1) to establish heart rate threshold, peak heart rate and heart rate at specific workloads; and (4) body fat (%). Results: From these tests, the cyclists are given a test summary sheet including the test data, heart rate training zones and graphic displays of physiological responses during the test. Training protocols are then established by their coach based on the test results. In addition, the Department of Kinesiology supplied eight of the “A” level cyclists with Power TapTM wheels where field data is recorded including training heart rate zones, power, speed and cadence. Each cyclist then down-loads this information to a computer in the lab where it is analyzed by the cyclist, the coach and an Exercise Physiologist. Conclusions: Based on the laboratory testing, training protocol intervention by the coach and field data from the Power TapTM wheels, the MWSU Cycling team and the Department of Kinesiology are an excellent example of how scientific measures may benefit the athlete.


9:15 – 9:30^ Upper Body Contribution in the Assessment of Lower Limb Power: Physiological and Mechanical Considerations


Julien S Baker, PhD and Bruce Davies, PhD

Health and Exercise Science Research Unit, University of Glamorgan


Introduction: We examined the influence of hand-grip strength on power profiles and blood lactate values during high intensity cycle ergometry. Methods: Fifteen male subjects each completed a 20-second cycle ergometer test twice, in a random manner, using two protocols, with a handgrip (WG), and without handgrip (WOHG). Handgrip strength was quantified prior to testing. Capillary (earlobe) bloods were collected at rest, immediately following exercise and five minutes post exercise. In the WG protocol, mean (±SD) blood lactate concentrations were 1.11 ± 0.7 mmol·l-1, 3.68 ± 1.2 mmol·l-1 and 8.14 ± 1.3 mmol·l-1 respectively. During the WOHG protocol, blood lactate values recorded were 0.99 ± 0.9 mmol·l-1, 3.68 ± 1.1 mmol·l-1 and 6.62 ± 0.9 mmol·l-1 respectively. Differences in lactate concentrations were found (P < 0.05) from rest to 5 minutes post exercise for both groups. Differences in concentrations were also observed between groups at the 5 minutes post exercise stage. Peak power output and fatigue index values were also greater using the WG protocol. (792 ± 73 W vs. 624 ± 66 W; 38 ± 6 vs. 24 ± 8 respectively; P < 0.05). No differences were recorded for Mean power output (MPO) or Work done (WD) between experimental conditions. We also examined cycle ergometer resistive force transmission issues during a standard calibration procedure. Results: Results indicated that resistive force transmission to the ergometer flywheel were attenuated at loads above 3 kg and was represented by a departure from linearity. Measurements of cycle ergometer head displacement indicated large deflections during a static calibration test. Differences were observed in load application between static and dynamic conditions, with dynamic tension being underestimated. Significant differences (P < 0.0001) in voltage measurements were observed between static and dynamic conditions. During static conditions values of 182 ± 94.9 mV were recorded compared with 104.9 ± 56.8 mV recorded during dynamic conditions. Conclusions: Results indicate that a dynamic calibration procedure overestimates resistive force transmitted to the flywheel. These findings suggest that the performance of traditional style leg cycle ergometry is influenced by a muscular contribution from the upper body and by upper body strength. Also, the design of the ergometer appears to be questionable in the assessment of high intensity exercise physiology and performance.


9:30 – 9:45 am ^ Cost-Benefit of Collegiate Athletics Based on Reported Physical Activity, Daily Limitations, Body Weight Change, Disease, and Prior Injury in Former Athletes


Kelly B. Friery, PhD1 and Phillip Bishop, EdD2
The University of Louisiana at Monroe1 and The University of Alabama2


Introduction: Collegiate athletes undergo high intensity training regimens that may result in chronic injuries and affect their ability to engage in physical activity. The purpose of this on-going study is to investigate the effects of prior participation in collegiate athletics on physical activity patterns, limitations in activity, and weight gain. Former Division I college athletes, and a demographically-similar group of alumni (controls), were surveyed via e-mail. Methods: The athletes were identified by each University’s alumni department. The survey included questions about current health and activity status. At this point, former athletes returned 710 surveys, and controls returned 3374 (35% return rate). Results: Athletes reported significantly (p<0.05) more limitations during daily activity (32%) and during physical activity (45%) than controls, who reported limitations 21% during daily activity and 30% during physical activity. Athletes also reported that a past injury effects their daily activity (19%) and physical activity (27%) significantly more frequently than controls who felt an injury affects activity 5.3% and 6.5%, respectively. Athletes reported performing physical activity with an injury (72%) and with an illness (62%), which was significantly greater than what the controls reported, with 16% exercising with an injury and 23.5% exercising with an illness. Male athletes reported a significantly greater increase in body weight vs. controls (p<0.05). Athletes reported doing fewer (p<0.05) hours per week of anaerobic/mixed activity than controls. Conclusions: The data suggest that prior collegiate athletics participation seems to have long term consequences in terms of limitations in activity and in body weight change (males). The higher incidence of major injuries and chronic injuries, and disability from these injuries in athletes (Friery, JEPonline, 2006) may explain these differences in part. These data will help to determine the potential risks associated with competitive collegiate athletics. This study has been repeated and data have been collected from many institutions, with results repeating themselves. Many interesting measures have resulted from the survey, and are continuing to be analyzed.


^ B. Lecture


9:45 – 10:00 am Strengthen your Career and Build your Business


Chris Bell, MA, EPC, CSCS, USAW

Director of Performance, Impact Sports Training, Duluth, MN

Brainstorming career options for exercise physiologists outside the clinical setting and, then, working to see them become successful are familiar themes to those who want to be their own boss. To be successful, there are important steps to starting one's own business. It involves many things, including 'risk-taking' to be sure. But, in a relatively short period of time from graduating with a Master's degree in Exercise Physiologist from St. Scholastica, Impact Sports Training evolved into a thriving business. It meets the complex performance needs of athletes, as well as that of adult clients.  This presentation will focus on building relationships and networking, the importance of understanding the fundamentals of business, and having an excellent academic background from which to develop safe and beneficial exercise and fitness assessments and programs.


10:00 – 10:15 am^ The 21st Century Exercise Physiologist: The Need for Research and Undergraduate Courses on Resistance Training


Jeremy C. Fransen, MS

Doctorate Student, Exercise Physiology, The University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM


Exercise physiology has traditionally focused research on endurance exercise. Research demonstrating the effectiveness of resistance training in health, athletics, and disease prevention has been growing steadily. However, it is obvious that many exercise physiology programs do not have an undergraduate course on resistance training. This is a problem for several reasons. First, the lack of coursework on resistance training leaves the new graduate with inadequate work skills in a competitive work force. The general public and athletes demand knowledgeable professionals to train, guide, and assist with resistance exercise. Second, the lack of resistance training curriculum reflects the comparatively low volume of research on resistance exercise. As a result, there are many basic resistance training principles that need further research. Finally, the decreased academic focus on resistance exercise has left a void within exercise physiology that is often times filled by a number of certification programs. Instead of leaving the teaching of resistance training to the certification organizations, it should be a part of every college/university exercise physiology program. With the diverse number of “exercise professionals” flooding the work force, exercise physiologists must distinguish themselves as true exercise professionals. This demands more undergraduate level courses along with hands-on laboratory procedures in resistance exercise. Including more emphasis in resistance training will help solidify the practice of exercise physiology and the future of the 21st century exercise physiologist.


10:15 – 10:30 am^ A Nation at Risk: What Exercise Physiologists Can Do?

Marcos Sanchez-Gonzalez, MD, EPC

Exercise Physiology Laboratory, Universidad del Turabo, Gurabo, PR


During the last decades, the increasing rate of morbidity and mortality from chronic diseases has made a considerable reduction in the health status and quality of life of many Americans. This increase may be attributable to lifestyle changes, including but not limited to, inadequate diet and lack of physical activity. Today, the increasing cost of healthcare treatments, mainly pharmacological, call into question the importance of well structured and scientifically planned exercise as a viable alternative (as one solution to the emerging public health problems). “A Nation at Risk: What Exercise Physiologists Can Do?” -- sets the perspective of regular exercise as an important treatment modality for many of the leading causes of death and disability. The exercise physiologist has the academic and laboratory assessment tools and knowledge to conduct and also administer exercise as a viable therapeutic step in prevention and management of certain lifestyle-driven diseases. The concept of Ex or Exercise “Treatment” is taken to a new level of thinking, and the alternatives that exercise physiologists have at their disposal and, therefore, their role in healthcare.


___________________________________________________________


10:30 – 10:45 Break


10:45 – 11:10 am ^ The 6 “C’s” of Lending – What Banks and Lenders Expect From Borrowers


Thomas C. Lanchoney, Jr., CPA

Master Student, Department of Exercise Physiology, The College of St. Scholastica, Duluth, MN


The 6 “C’s” of lending form the analytical framework in the decision making process of every banker and lender. Loan application information provided by the prospective borrower as well as credit history and other personal, non-financial data is carefully scrutinized by lenders in making their loan determinations. The 6 “Cs” of lending are as follows: First, Capacity to repay the loan, or Cash Flow: Most bankers rank the above “C” as the most important. Banks/lenders are primarily concerned with being repaid. In order to feel confident of collecting their loan, banks need as much personal and business financial data as possible. Second, Collateral: Once again, lenders are principally concerned with collecting on their loan. In this regard, should a borrower default on a loan, a lender needs to liquidate the collateral or security behind the loan to recover what is owed. Lenders evaluate loan security or collateral based upon how quickly the collateral can be liquidated and for what amount. Third, Capital investment: Generally speaking, banks prefer to share the debt risk. This is most applicable to business loans for funding a start up operation. Banks want the business owner to show confidence in the venture by personally risking from 25% to 50% of the total funds needed for the start up operation. Fourth, Conditions in the marketplace: What are the demographics of the market in which a business is expected to operate? Is the local economy growing or declining? These are questions that regional lenders will separately determine. Fifth, Credit history: All of the local bankers interviewed by the speaker emphasized the importance of a an excellent credit rating. Bankers and elephants have long memories, so a clean personal and business credit history is vital to obtaining a loan, particularly a start up loan. It would behoove a potential borrower to review their credit history using any of the major credit reporting services. Sixth, Character: Banks take personal character very seriously. Criminal records leave lasting imprints.


SESSION 3 – Keynote Speaker


11:10 – 11:15 am Introduction

Jesse Pittsley, PhD, EPC

Assistant Professor

Program of Exercise Science

Winston-Salem State University

Winston-Salem, NC


11:15 – 12:00 pm^ Exercise Medicine Clinic: An Option for Exercise Physiologists
>



Dan Halvorsen, PhD

Clinical Director, Kohl's PowerCubed Exercise Medicine Clinic, Minneapolis/St. Paul, MN


Exercise Medicine begins with exercise physiology, which focuses on how the body's physical and chemical makeup relate to physical activities such as play, school, and leisure. As the Clinical Director of Kohl's PowerCubed Exercise Medicine Clinic, I will discuss the application of the principles of exercise physiology to help children and teens improve their health, fitness, and energy. One among many objectives is to help children boost their self-esteem, and to enjoy physical activities and exercise throughout their lives. In general, this presentation will cover three primary objectives: (1) to provide each patient / athlete with an outcome based exercise prescription (ExRx). (2) to integrate Exercise Medicine into the treatment care package by working closely with providers, medical staff, and referring physicians. (3) To evaluate Exercise Medicine outcomes per disease category and overall benefits through ongoing research.


___________________________________________________________


12:00 – 1:15 Lunch

___________________________________________________________


SESSION 4 – LECTURE AND RESEARCH


1:15 – 1:20 pm Introduction

Larry Birnbaum, PhD, FASEP, EPC

Professor and Graduate Program Director

Department of Exercise Physiology

The College of St. Scholastica

Duluth, MN


  1. ^ Lecture


1:20 – 1:40 pm Exercise Induced Rhabdomyolysis: Behind the Scenes


Jonathan Mike, MS, CSCS, NSCA-CPT

University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico


Exercise induced Rhabdomyolysis is characteristic of skeletal muscle degeneration due to injury, traumatic or non-traumatic origins leading to muscle necrosis and cell death. An estimated 26,000 cases are reported yearly in the United States (Harriston 2004). Exertional Rhabdomylsis is regularly observed after intense exercise incorporating eccentric muscular contractions, due to increased strain placed on the muscle tissue causing muscle damage to the muscle fiber (Springer 2003) However, this condition is rarely localized. Major causes of rhabdomyolysis include crush injuries, burns, infections, medications, drugs, and exercise. Misdiagnosed or left untreated can result in severe complications such as acute renal failure (ARF), hypocalcemia, hyperkalemia, hypervolemia, muscle necrosis, cardiac abnormalities, compartment syndrome, and disseminated intravascular coagulation (D1C) Sauret 2002). In addition, ‘exertional rhabdomyolysis’ is one of the most common forms of rhabdomyolysis and is usually seen as exercise induced. This condition occurs mainly in military and sports training exercise in high temperatures in untrained individuals. Muscle necrosis and cell death take place mostly in dehydrated and/or untrained persons during downhill walking, running, or strength training exercises (Visewewaran 1999; Walsworth 2001). Under normal conditions, heat is generated and contributes to the shunting of the blood from the gastrointestinal track and kidneys to the skin for dissipation of heat. In turn, this leads to muscle hypoxia, muscle necrosis, cell death and muscle ATP depletion. Once the process occurs, both short term and long term complications can develop.


1:40 – 2:00 pm^ A Clinical and Legal Guide to Employment Physical Evaluation


Brent A. Ruiz, PhD

President of Arcon Rehabilitation Concepts, Inc.


Physical ability testing for post-offer of employment or return to work
evaluation requires knowledge of the appropriate statues governing
employment testing, as well as comprehension of the scientific literature
and clinical approaches to this area of practice.  The presentation
discusses the statutory framework, a review of the scientific methodology
and outlines the significant elements of physical ability testing.  Analysis
of the essential functions of a job is identified as a key component.


B. Research


2:00 – 2:15 pm Entrainment of Breathing to Locomotion in Elite Distance Runners

^

Robert A. Robergs, PhD, FASEP, EPC1 and J. Karp, PhD

1Professor of Exercise Physiology and Biochemistry, Exercise Physiology Laboratories, The University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM



Introduction: There is considerable evidence that a pattern exists between breathing and locomotion in animals and humans, such that the rhythm of locomotion coordinates, or entrains, the rhythm of breathing. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship, and possible entrainment, of breathing and stride rate in elite distance runners during exercise at 70, 90, 100, and 110% of the ventilatory threshold (VT). Methods: Fifteen male, highly-trained distance runners performed a maximal oxygen consumption test and a locomotor-respiratory coupling test (six min each at 70, 90 and 100 % VT, and 3 min at 110% VT, with five min recovery between each run). Blood oxygen saturation was estimated during exercise to determine the presence of EIH. Pulmonary function was assessed as a screening tool for pulmonary dysfunction and to determine the presence of expiratory flow limitations (FL). Entrainment expressed as a step-to-breath ratio average for the final 3 min of data for each intensity, as well as the proportion of breaths occurring within 0.05 s from each foot strike. Percent entrainment based on time was compared to a computer generated random breathing to stride model. Results: The most common step-to-breath ratios were 5:1 and 2:1. Foot strike (as determined by touchdown of the first metatarsal) occurred an average of 0.10 ± 0.03 second from the beginning of an inspiration (Ti) and 0.09 ± 0.02 second from the beginning of an expiration (Te). However, there was large variability in the degree of entrainment between subjects. Data for actual and chance entrainment, expressed as a % of breaths adhering to the 0.05 s criteria are; 13.1 ± 7.8, 23.1 ± 14.5, 28.4 ± 16.5, and 30.8 ± 14.9% vs. 2.2 ± 1.2, 2.6 ± 1.5, 4.4 ± 1.8, and 4.8 ± 2.3% for 70, 90, 100, and 110% VT, and measured vs. chance, respectively; p<0.001). Findings: Overall, entrainment occurred for an average of 25% of breaths, which was significantly greater than that which would occur by chance. Entrainment of breathing to locomotion therefore seems to be a physiological phenomenon in highly trained distance runners.


2:15 – 2:30 pm ^ The Effect of Remote Voluntary Contractions on Peak Torque, Rate of Torque Development, and Work


Luke Garceau, Christopher Geiser, PT, LAT, David Leigh, MS, ATC and William P. Ebben, PhD, MSSW, CSCS*D

Marquette University Department of Physical Therapy/Program in Exercise Science, Milwaukee, WI


Introduction: Concurrent activation potentiation (CAP) is purported to enhance the force capabilities of muscles via the contraction of muscles remote from the prime mover (1). This phenomenon has been described as remote voluntary contractions (RVC) (1). Recent evidence supports the effect of RVC’s on variables such as the rate of force development (RFD) during hand gripping (2) and the vertical jump (3), and increased torque of isometric knee extensors (4). The objective of this study was to assess the effect of RVC’s including jaw clenching, hand gripping, and the Valsalva maneuver on isometric knee extensor peak torque (PT), rate of torque development (RTD), and work (W), as well as isokinetic knee extensor and flexor PT, RTD, and W. Methods: Nine men (mean ± SD, age 21.11 ± 1.54 yr; body mass 84.4 ± 11.61 kg) who regularly participated in lower body resistance training served as subjects for this study. Subjects provided informed written consent and the study was approved by the institution’s internal review board. The test conditions were assessed using a Biodex System IV dynamometer (Biodex Inc., Shirley, NY). Subjects performed warm up sets at 75% and test sets at 100% of their of maximum isometric knee extension at 60 degrees for 5 seconds, as well as isokinetic concentric knee extension and flexion at 60 degrees/sec for 3 repetitions. Warm up and test sets were counterbalanced for the RVC and normal (NO-RVC) conditions. The RVC condition included the Valsalva maneuver, jaw clenching on a mouthpiece, and bilateral maximal handgrip using hand dynamometers (Lafayette Hand Dynamometer, model 78010, Lafayette Industries, Lafayette, IN). The NO-RVC condition included no jaw clenching, handgripping, or Valsalva maneuver. Data were reduced using Biodex System IV software (Biodex Med System Software Version 1.56, Biodex Inc., Shirley, NY). The PT and RTD during the first 300 MS of each repetition were calculated for isometric and isokinetic conditions. Work was calculated for three seconds from the onset of torque production for the isometric condition and for each complete repetition in the isokinetic condition. The potential differences in these variables between RVC and NO-RVC condition were evaluated using an ANOVA. Data are presented as mean values  standard deviations with an a priori alpha level of P ≤ 0.05. Statistical power and effect sizes are described as d and η². Results: The statistical analyses revealed significant differences between test conditions during isometric testing. Compared to the NO-RVC condition, the RVC condition resulted in 11.86% greater isometric knee extensor PT (P = 0.001, d = 0.99, η² = 0.79), 21.05% higher RTD (P = 0.032, d = 0.62, η² = 0.46), and 16.53% more W (P=0.016, d = 0.76, η² = 0.54). Significant differences were also found between conditions for all isokinetic tests, averaged for all three repetitions. Compared to the NO-RVC condition, the RVC condition demonstrated 13.01% greater mean knee extensor PT (P = 0.005, d = 0.91, η² = 0.64), 16.24% greater mean knee flexor PT (P = 0.009, d = 0.86, η² = 0.60), 13.04% greater knee extensor RTD (P = 0.011, d = 0.82, η² = 0.58), 13.05% greater knee flexor RTD (P = 0.00, d = 1.00, η² = 0.88), and 10.3% and 10.0% greater W during knee extension (P = 0.006, d = 0.90, η² = 0.63) and flexion (P = 0.003, d = 0.96, η² = 0.68), respectively. Discussion: Results indicate that compared to the NO-RVC condition, the use of RVC’s resulted in enhanced performance of all variables assessed. It is interesting to note that for all subjects and every repetition of testing, every outcome variable was enhanced in the RVC condition. Peak torque was augmented by 11.86 to 13.01% in the isometric and isokinetic tests, respectively, which is similar to previous work conducted in our laboratory demonstrating that the same combination of RVCs augmented isometric PT by 14.6% compared to the NO-RVC condition (4). In addition to PT, the present study examined the RTD in the RVC condition which was higher than in the NO-RVC condition, for both isometric and isokinetic tests and for knee extensors as well as knee flexors. The difference between the RVC and NO-RVC conditions ranged from 13.04 to 21.05% in the present study. No previous study has assessed the effect of RVC’s with isokinetic testing. Previous research investigated the effect of jaw clenching on RFD, demonstrated a 15.8% greater handgripping RFD compared to the NO-RVC condition (2). Research has also demonstrated that jaw clenching increased RFD by approximately 19.5% during the countermovement jump (3). Thus, the results of the present study indicate that the RTD during the RVC condition is in a similar range as previous studies examining RFD. It is interesting to note that in the present study, the RVC enhanced RTD of knee extensors and knee flexors was 13.04% and 13.05%, respectively, demonstrating that the effect was highly consistent among the muscles groups assessed. This study demonstrated that RVCs produce an ergogenic advantage in both isometric and dynamic test conditions, thus increasing external validity compared to previous tests (4). This study also demonstrates that muscles other than knee extensors accrue the advantages associated with CAP. Practitioners are encouraged to prescribe RVC’s during resistance training and/or sports that require the acute expression of strength, and assess the practical effects. References: 1. Ebben. J. Strength Conditioning Res. 20(4): 985-91, 2006. 2. Hiroshi. Kokubyo Gakkai Zasshi. 70(2):82-8, 2003. 3. Ebben et al. J. Strength Conditioning Res. In press. 4. Ebben et al. Med. Science Sport Exerc. (In review).


2:30 – 2:45 pm Self-Reported Awareness of Health, Fitness Status, Body Composition, Stress, and Diet in African-American College-Aged Students


Kevin J. Ritsche, MA, EPC, Jesse Pittsley, PhD, EPC Aysel Kavas, PhD, Theresa Stratta, PhD, and Cynthia Brown, PhD

Assistant Professor of Exercise Science, Department of Human Performance & Sports Sciences, Winston-Salem State University, Winston-Salem, NC


Young adulthood (ages 18-29), a common age for college attendance, is characterized by life changes such as school, work and other life events, and may result in reduced physical activity and increased weight gain during this time period. It is important to identify the unhealthy behavior patterns during adolescence and young adult years and to educate and motivate young people to change their behaviors to more positive ones even in the presence of self-awareness of detrimental risk factors. Furthermore, African Americans are more vulnerable to obesity and weight-related issues. However, present research has not identified the self-awareness patterns of health and fitness and their relationship to actual measures representing these variables in college-aged African-Americans. Purpose: To examine the relationship between self-awareness of current fitness, health, diet, stress and sleeping patterns with measures of physical fitness and body composition in college-aged African-Americans. Methods: The current study was conducted amount 128 students at a Southeastern Historically Black University (HBCU). Students were asked to rate their current overall health, fitness level, diet, sleeping patterns and perceived stress levels. Students were also assessed for body composition and physical fitness status using common laboratory procedures and basic field tests. Results: The findings indicate a significant correlation (p<0.001) between self-awareness of overall health and self-reported levels of current fitness status (r = 0.562), emotional health (r = 0.505) sleeping patterns (r = 0.383), diet (r =0.493), stress (r = -0.282) body weight (r = 0.461) and satisfaction with life (r = 0.481). Furthermore, self-awareness ratings of current fitness levels indicate a significant correlation (p < 0.01) with the number of days per week of self-reported high-intensity exercise (r = 0.329), body weight (r = -0.228), total fat (r = 0.229), waist circumference (r = -0.202), hip circumference (r = -0.299) and BMI (r = -0.259). Conclusion: This primarily African-American female sample validated the consistency in their overall rating of self–reported health and health-related behaviors. However, this study did find low but statistically significant relationships between self-reported fitness status and the direct measure of body composition and self-reported high-intensity physical activity. Despite the statistical significance, one would believe that there would be a higher correlation between these measured variables and one’s self-reported fitness and health status. Therefore, cultural differences between measures of body composition and overall health and fitness status must be further examined.


2:45 – 3:00 pm ^ Correlation of Training and Performance in the Elite Sit-Ski Athlete


Jodi Tervo and Randall L. Jensen, PhD, FACSM, CSCS 

Department of HPER, Northern Michigan University, Marquette, MI


Purpose: This study helps to form a foundation for further research with Paralympic Nordic sit-ski athletes. This study focused on correlation between training and performance. Methods: Subjects in this study were elite paralympic athletes, who filled out a survey during a week of national competition. The author handed out the questionnaire to the athletes and was available for questions. The athletes had five days to complete the seven-page survey. The subjects handed the survey back directly to the author. The “Training and Performance Questionnaire” was revised from the form created by Will Hopkins. This survey included general questions regarding age, height, weight, competition category, years of training, total yearly volume, type of training program, weeks spent in each phase of training, coach interaction, and nutritional considerations. This survey went on to ask about a typical week in each phase. A bivariate correlation was performed, using SPSS v.15.0. Results: There were few significant findings. A significant correlation between race week skill time spent and the 9 km adjusted time had an r = -.990 (p < .001). Raw time of 9 km and raw time of 1.3 km correlated with an r = .990 (p < .001). Discussion: After reviewing literature and performing extensive searches on training and performance correlations for sit-ski athletes there were no studies found. This may be due to the small number of paralympic athletes, especially involved in sit skiing. This study is a starting point for further research in this area, and the survey was developed and given to a team of national competing athletes. Due to the low number of subjects, the results of this study need further investigation.

___________________________________________________________


SESSION 5 - LECTURE



3:00 – 3:05 pm Introduction


Larry Birnbaum, PhD, FASEP, EPC

Professor and Graduate Program Director

Department of Exercise Physiology

The College of St. Scholastica

Duluth, MN


A. Lecture

3:05 – 3:30 pm Professional Development of Exercise Physiology: Why Should I Care?


Joseph M. Warpeha, MA, ^ EPC, RCEP, ES, HFI, CSCS*D, NSCA-CPT*D

Doctorate Student, Exercise Physiology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN


The purpose of this presentation is to illustrate some of the obstacles that exercise physiologists face today as the result of a field that historically has not addressed issues of professional development. These challenges will be chronicled by a doctoral candidate in exercise physiology who has had the opportunity to interact with a wide variety of allied health professionals, researchers, and teachers in a large university setting over the course of the past 4 years. This talk is specifically given from the perspective of a student who obtained a graduate degree in exercise physiology at one of the first ASEP-accredited programs. This is a critical point because exposure to a topic like professionalism in an academic degree program is an important means by which to generate critical thinking on the part of the student and future exercise physiologist. Specific examples related to the inherent risks of allowing a professional title to be bestowed, officially or unofficially, upon unqualified individuals will be given. Additionally, there will be a brief discussion on the roles of those in leadership positions. Traditionally, college professors in exercise physiology programs are best positioned to instill an understanding and appreciation for professionalism. However, these individuals have failed to do so due to: (1) a lack of understanding or appreciation on their part; (2) a lack of concern for the importance of professional development in exercise physiology; and/or (3) a lack of appropriate curriculum that could be used as a vehicle for the integration of this subject matter.


3:30 – 4:00 pm Using LabVIEW Programming to Improve The Teaching of Exercise Physiology

^

Robert A. Robergs, PhD, FASEP, EPC

Professor of Exercise Physiology and Biochemistry, Exercise Physiology Laboratories, The University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM



This presentation will explain and show how use of custom programming can improve teaching of key content in exercise physiology. Programming will be demonstrated that functions to reinforce concepts in indirect calorimetry, bomb calorimetry, steady state VO2 prediction, incremental protocol development, bioenergetics, electrocardiography, and breath-by-breath data processing.


4:00 – 4:15 pm ^ The Realities of Job Opportunities After College: What I Wish I Had Known


Sara English, BA, ES

Nursing Student, Normandale Junior College, Bloomington, MN


This presentation will address work related experiences as a personal trainer in the public sector, different certifications that are frequently considered important to find work, and the various job opportunities that have been available since graduating from college. This will entail a brief analysis of the potential jobs in several states, personal reflection as a parent, and how the overall search for the right job may have been enhanced with appropriate counseling and mentoring prior to graduation. Also, it will important to address the competition that exists among candidates of different degree programs (e.g., physical therapy and nursing). Finally, this presentation will consider the role of going back to school to help make candidates more marketable for more career opportunities in healthcare.


4:15 – 4:30 pm^ Growing an Exercise Physiology Business: An Individual Focus in a Diverse Field


Desiree Ahrens Granowski, MA, EPC

Ahrens Exercise Physiology, Owner and Lead Exercise Physiologist


Exercise Physiologists have the background and flexibility to be of service to the population around them. An Exercise Physiology small business, such as Ahrens Exercise Physiology, is an excellent path for an Exercise Physiologist entrepreneur. A small business has the ability to cater to a variety of clients while providing very specific and individual services. Ahrens Exercise Physiology has focused on five areas in the last year to grow the business: (1) client; (2) employee; (3) self; (4) community; and (5) research. I will discuss these areas as well as the skills and characteristics needed by an Exercise Physiologist entrepreneur.


___________________________________________________________


SESSION 6 - OPEN FORUM


4:30 – 4:55 pm An Open Forum to Discuss and Answer Questions from the Audience in Regards to ASEP and the Professionalism of Exercise Physiology


Robert A. Robergs, PhD, FASEP, EPC

Co-Founder of the ASEP organization

Past Editor-in-Chief, JEPonline

Professor, Exercise Physiology and Biochemistry

Director, Exercise Physiology Laboratories

Johnson Center

The University of New Mexico

Albuquerque, NM


The purpose of the Open Forum is provide the opportunity for those win attendance to engage in an open discussion regarding the professionalism of exercise physiology. All questions and/or concerns will be addressed by in an effort to help others appreciate the purpose and vision of the American Society of Exercise Physiologists. To prepare for the Forum, you may want to review the ASEP vision and mission statements, goals and objectives.


^ 4:55 – 5:00 Closing the Day! Final Thoughts

Lonnie Lowery, PhD, RD, LD

ASEP President

Associate Professor of Nutrition

University of Akron

Akron, OH


6:00 – 8:00 pm ASEP Social


Shane Paulson, MA, EPC

MNAEP President

Minnesota Association of Exercise Physiologists


The MNAEP is proud to be the professional organization dedicated to the advancement of Exercise Physiologists in Minnesota and surrounding states of the upper Midwest. Founded April of 2000, it is modeled after our national organization (ASEP). Since then, MNAEP has followed the ASEP example of the developing the infrastructure within Minnesota to operate as a profession (code of ethics, scope of practice, and accreditation of academic programs).  Members of MNAEP acknowledge and support our professional relationship with the American Society of Exercise Physiologists. After 10 years, the momentum of our emerging profession is reaching a critical mass.  More than ever, preventable diseases are in the news and Exercise Physiologists are leading the charge to implement proactive and preventative intervention programs.


___________________________________________________________


^ SATURDAY, APRIL 12, 2008


8:00 – 9:00 am Registration


SESSION 7 – RESEARCH AND LECTURES


9:00 – 9:05 am Welcome and Introduction

Lonnie Lowery, PhD, RD, LD

ASEP President

Associate Professor of Nutrition

University of Akron

Akron, OH


A. Research


9:05 – 9:20 am Gender Differences in Muscle Activation during Jump Landings and Cutting Movements


McKenzie Fauth, Christina R. Feldmann, Erich Patushek, Brittney Lutsch, Casey Vogel, Luke Garceau, Brittni Hsu, William P. Ebben

Marquette University Department of Physical Therapy/Program in Exercise Science, Milwaukee, WI 53201

Introduction: Gender differences in muscle activation have been studied during functional movements, yielding mixed results (2,3,4). Unfortunately, previous studies examining jump landings used the same drop jump height for all subjects, potentially creating disproportionately greater muscular demand for women, who do not jump as high as men (1). Thus, previous findings of greater muscle activation (3,4) and quadriceps dominance (3) of women may be due to the greater relative overload and not as a result of gender difference in muscle activation patterns. Compared to men, women have also demonstrated increased quadriceps activation and decreased hamstring activation during cutting maneuvers (2). This study was designed to assess the magnitude and timing of muscle activation and hamstring to quadriceps activation ratios (H:Q), and gender differences therein, during jump landings and cutting maneuvers. Methods: Subjects included 12 men (age= 21.0 ± 1.2 years) and 12 women (age= 19.91 ± 0.9 years) university students. All subjects provided informed consent and the study was approved by the university review board. Subjects performed 3 repetitions of maximum voluntary isometric contractions (MVIC) for the quadriceps and hamstring muscles. Subjects also performed 3 repetitions each of the drop jump from a height equal to their vertical jump (J) as well as a sprint and cut at a 45 degree angle (C). Electromyographic (EMG) data were collected for the rectus femoris (RF), vastus lateralis (VL), vastus medialis (VM), lateral hamstring (LH), and medial hamstring (MH) with a telemetered EMG system (Myomonitor IV, DelSys Inc. Boston, MA, USA). Root mean square (RMS) signal processing was used on all EMG data which were analyzed for the second to third second of the MVICs, and for the muscles bursts pre and post landing for the J and C. From this data, the timing of muscle activation and RMS were calculated for each muscle group prior to and after foot contact using the average of all 3 trials of the J and C and were normalized to the average of the 3 trials of the MVIC. Hamstring to quadriceps activation ratios were calculated by taking the collective average of the hamstring muscles and dividing by the collective average of the quadriceps muscles for each subject. The timing of the foot contact was synchronized with the EMG system using a switch mat (Lafayette Industries, Lafayette, IN). Statistics: Data were evaluated with SPSS 16.0 using an ANOVA to assess gender differences in the magnitude and timing of muscle activation and the H:Q pre and post foot contact for the J and C, for all muscles assessed. Results: Significant gender differences were found for both the LH (P=0.013) and the MH (P=0.015) activation prior to foot contact during the C. Women attained 38.4 and 34.3% less activation than men for the LH and MH, respectively. Significant gender differences were also found for both the LH (P=0.029) and the MH (P=0.030) activation after foot contact during the C. Women attained 19.71 and 26.38% less activation than men for the LH and MH, respectively. No significant gender differences in muscle activation were found for the RF, VL, or VM pre or post foot contact for the C, or for any of the muscles assessed pre or post foot contact for the J. Significant gender differences in H:Q (P=0.033) were found prior to foot contact during the C, with women attaining a 23.4% lower H:Q. Significant gender differences in H:Q (P=0.007) were also found after foot contact during the C, with women attaining a 30.9% lower H:Q. No significant gender differences in H:Q were found pre or post foot contact for the J. Significant gender differences were found for the time of onset of muscle burst prior to landing in the J condition, with men demonstrating earlier time of onset than women for the VL (P=0.012) and VM (P=0.016), representing 24.6 and 18.4% differences, respectively . Men also demonstrated shorter duration muscle burst than women for the RF and VM during the post landing phase of the C, resulting in 19.7 and 16.2% shorter burst duration for the RF and VM, respectively. No other significant gender differences in burst onset prior to foot contact or burst duration after foot contact were found for either the J or C. Women demonstrated 75.2% of the jumping ability of men (P=0.001). Discussion: The gender difference in jumping ability of the women in this study (75.2% of the value of men) compares similarly to research demonstrating that women have a vertical jump of 73.1% of their male counterparts (1). Thus, this measure of training status suggests that the female subjects in this study were not atypical. Compared to men, women demonstrated less LH and MH activation as well as lower H:Q during the pre and post contact phase of the C, confirming previous findings that women are Q dominant and unable to activate the H as well as men (2). Lower levels of LH and MH activation and H:Q may be a risk factor for ACL injuries. However, no gender difference in muscle activation were found during the J, in contrast to previous studies (3,4). This finding demonstrates that when assessing gender differences in muscle activation, the jumping task needs to be normalized to each subject’s jump height and questions previous findings of gender differences in muscle activation (3,4). Men activate their VL and VM earlier then women prior to foot contact during the J which is without precedent in the literature. Furthermore, men demonstrated shorter burst duration for the RF, VL, and VM post foot contact during the C, presumably due to gender differences in attenuating ground reaction forces during landing. Future research should assess the effect of training interventions on hamstring muscle activation and H:Q during cutting maneuvers, particularly for women. References: 1. Ebben et al. Gender similarities in rate of force development and time to takeoff during the countermovement jump. J. Exerc. Physiol. Online. 10(6):2007. 2. Malinzak et al. A comparison of knee joint motion patterns between men and women in selected athletic tasks. Clin. Biomech. 16:438-445. 2001. 3. Nagano et al. Gender differences in knee kinematics and muscle activity during single limb drop landings. The Knee 14:218-223. (2007). 4. Rozzi et al. Knee joint laxity and neuromuscular characteristics of male and female soccer and basketball players. Am. J. Sports Med. 27(3):312-319.1999.

B. Lecture


9:20 – 9:40 am Dietary Protein in Sport: Still Controversial


Lonnie Lowery, PhD, RD, LD

ASEP President, Associate Professor of Nutrition, University of Akron, Akron, OH


For decades dietary protein has enjoyed and suffered a controversial role in sports nutrition. Scientific literature on protein metabolism and needs, the safety of high protein intakes, and protein’s affect on other dietary components remains contentious. Further, (sometimes spirited) opinions differ between hard training athletes and the healthcare authorities that interact with them. On one end of the spectrum, overzealous athletes may consume hundreds of grams per day in an effort to build muscle mass. On the other end of the spectrum, educators and sports organizations, presumably trying to dissuade such wasteful or “risky” behavior, often use strong or negative language when addressing students and athletes. Population-specific research is called for. In particular, the safety of high-protein diets remains largely unexplored among (resistance-trained) athletes. Athletes exhibit different renal function, bone characteristics and dietary habits from other populations. These facts suggest that evidence of kidney “stress” and/ or bone loss extrapolated from diabetic, hypertensive and elderly populations may be inappropriately applied to young athletes. Further, the concept that high protein diets are by nature high-saturated fat, high-cholesterol and/or low-fiber diets may not be the case with athletes who purposefully consume ample protein from selected sources. This presentation reviews literature regarding dietary protein in athletes, documents some of the controversial language surrounding the efficacy and safety of protein-focused diets, explores reasons why there is controversy, and calls for more objective, population-specific research to improve the education of students and athletes.


9:40 – 10:00 am ^ The Role of the Exercise Physiologist in a Physician Neck and Back Clinic


Janessa Defreitas, MA, EPC

Rehab Associate, Physician Neck and Back Clinics, Roseville, MN


Exercise physiologists have the opportunity to work in numerous areas within healthcare. From cardiac rehabilitation to research to working with patients in a Physician Neck and Back Clinic, there is the opportunity to use the scientific aspects of exercise physiology. The following study, The Clinical Effects of Intensive, Specific Exercise on Chronic Low Back Pain: A Controlled Study of 895 Consecutive Patients with 1-Year Follow Up, indicates the benefits of a specific exercise program supervised by exercise physiologists. Introduction: The clinical effects of an intensive and highly specific exercise program designed to treat chronic low back pain were evaluated. Methods: Eight hundred ninety-five consecutive chronic low back pain patients were evaluated. Six hundred twenty-seven completed the program. One hundred sixty-one began, but dropped out, and 107 were recommended for treatment but did not undergo treatment for various reasons. Average duration of symptoms prior to evaluation was 26 months. Forty-seven percent of the patients were workers' compensation patients. The primary treatment was intensive, specific exercise using firm pelvic stabilization to isolate and rehabilitate the lumbar spine musculature. The patients were encouraged to work hard to achieve specific goals. Findings: Seventy-six percent of patients completing the program had excellent or good results. At 1-year follow up 94% of patients with good or excellent results reported maintaining their improvement. Results in the control group were significantly poorer in all areas surveyed except employment. 


10:00 – 10:20 am ^ Exercise Physiology in the Medical Treatment Model


Shane Paulson MA, EPC

Founder and CEO, PhysioLogic Human Performance Systems, LLC.


Exercise Physiology, as a healthcare profession, bridges the current gap between the medical system (and payment) and the effective provision of exercise based prevention and treatment programs.


  • Recognition, opportunities, and reimbursement – acceptance, TRUST, and embrace from the medical community are critical.

  • Similarities to Dentistry…reassessments accomplished on a 6 month schedule provide opportunity for continued progress and maintenance of the highest achievable levels of functional capacity that relate to health and wellness.

  • Medical community and payer sources knowledge that assessments and results can be communicated to other members of the participant’s healthcare team as well as the exercise professionals who help the individual execute the needed daily programming (if not the Exercise Physiologist).


The American Society of Exercise Physiologists was established in 1997 to legitimize the profession with a standardized curriculum and academic accreditation, scope of practice, code of ethics, and Board Certification.


  • Board Certification is important for recognition in the medical model (i.e., PT, OT, RN, MD). Who are you networking with?

  • Professionalization is an attitude! As a NEW healthcare profession, there is a relative lack of practicing EPC professionals (outside of academics) to serve as a model for students and new graduates to emulate.

  • Building confidence without experience…can it be done?

  • Using any job position to create change.

  • Creating new job positions and the EP entrepreneur.


10:20 – 10:30 am You are The Leaders of the Future

Tommy Boone, PhD, MPH, FASEP, EPC

Professor and Chair, Department of Exercise Physiology, The College of St. Scholastica, Duluth, MN

Behind the scenes of every academic program, there are faculty members who are responsible for teaching courses in the physical education major, others who teach courses in the athletic training major, and still others who teach courses in the exercise science major. As an example, look at this list of department titles. Now, fast-forward through several decades and ask, "What has changed?" Nothing! The issue of diverse department titles and quality of education has seldom been addressed. Most are stuck in a phase of growth that no longer serves the students. Academic exercise physiologists have lost sight of "exercise as medicine" and that exercise physiology at its core is a healthcare profession. Research is important and, in fact, it is an obvious requirement for being a profession. There are other requirements, too. One that is critical to any profession is the support of its professional organization. Others include a code of ethics, accreditation, and standards of practice. The glue that holds every profession together is the sense of common identity that is tied to a common purpose. None of this exists within departments that embrace a failed sports medicine rhetoric; one that is infectious but misleading. It is time to clean away the old thinking, and replace it with a new way to think about who we are and what we do. I imagine the new way might look something like this and, if you will, a recipe for coming together. Please appreciate that challenging yourself to get out of your comfort zone is not easy. In fact, most can’t or will not do it. There are many kinds of risks in life: emotional, intellectual, and physical.

___________________________________________________________


10:30 – 10:45 am Break

___________________________________________________________


SESSION 8 – LECTURE


10:45 – 10:50 am Introduction

Tommy Boone, PhD, MPH, FASEP, EPC

Professor and Chair

Department of Exercise Physiology

The College of St. Scholastica

Duluth, MN


10:50 – 11:10 am^ Intellectual Property Law and the Exercise Physiologist


Rita D. Hutchens, JD, BS

Candidate for Master’s degree in Exercise Physiology, The College of St. Scholastica, Duluth, MN, Practice of law; Development and adminstration of umbrella organization for independently practicing specialty physicians.


Intellectual property covers a broad spectrum of rights. It includes legal rights associated with patents, trade secrets, trademarks and copyrights. While a patent gives a legal monopoly, granted by the US Patent and Trademark Office for the use, sale and manufacture of an invention, trade secrets protect competitively significant information. While an idea may fall within the scope of a patent or trade secret, the creative expression of that idea may be protected by copyright, providing the owner the right to control reproduction, modification, distribution, performance and display of a creative work. Trademarks are words, symbols or devices which distinguish one from one’s competitors. In particular, trademark and copyright are two areas with which the exercise physiologist should have some familiarity, particularly when planning a business venture. An understanding of these two areas of intellectual property rights will not only protect one’s own work product, but will serve to provide an understanding of the scope of protection possibly enjoyed by one’s competitors.


11:10 -11:30 am ^ Examining the Metabolic Syndrome in Adolescents


Paul Mellick, MA, EPC

Adjunct Instructor, Winston-Salem State University, Winston-Salem, NC

Doctorate Student, University of North Carolina-Greensboro


Obesity and overweight have been linked with not only heart disease, but several other vascular disorders. This combination of disorders has been defined as the metabolic syndrome (MS). Although an exact definition is not totally agreed upon, it is generally accepted that MS is made up of some sort of combination of insulin resistance, abdominal obesity, triglyceride abnormalities, and hypertension. While this definition is widely accepted for adults, little research exists regarding MS in adolescents. The purpose of this lecture is to examine the current literature regarding MS in adolescents. Although the parameters of MS are likely to be similar in adults and adolescents, the role of development and puberty play a significant role in the development of these markers of MS. It is important to examine what exact role that is. As childhood obesity becomes more and more prevalent, the definition, diagnosis and, most importantly, the prevention of MS in adolescents needs to be thoroughly researched.


11:30 – 11:45 am Awards and Recognition


Robert Robergs, PhD, FASEP, EPC

Co-Founder of the ASEP organization

Past Editor-in-Chief, JEPonline

Professor, Exercise Physiology and Biochemistry

Director, Exercise Physiology Laboratories

Johnson Center

The University of New Mexico

Albuquerque, NM


11:45 – 12:00 pm Closing Remarks


Lonnie Lowery, PhD, RD, LD

ASEP President

Associate Professor of Nutrition

University of Akron

Akron, OH


12 noon Adjourn






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